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A hypothetical driver only drives for 2 weeks.

percy_ardmore

Well-Known Member
The IRS takes the position that regardless of whether or not you “get a form” reporting income you earned as an independent contractor, you are required to report that income.
If you don't get a form the IRS didn't get one either and only your honesty on your return would tell them you have that income.
 

Older Chauffeur

Well-Known Member
If you don't get a form the IRS didn't get one either and only your honesty on your return would tell them you have that income.
So you can rely on U/L and the USPS to never make an error that might prevent your receipt of a form? Okay, you go with that and don’t report the income.
 

lyft_rat

Well-Known Member
So you can rely on U/L and the USPS to never make an error that might prevent your receipt of a form? Okay, you go with that and don’t report the income.
Certain checks are made on every tax filing. Nothing super bad will happen but you WILL get a bill in the mail (with interest charged).
 

percy_ardmore

Well-Known Member
If I made a few K from rideshare and didn't get a form, I would contact U or L to get the form. If I made < 1000 and didn't get a form, the IRS has better things to do than chase after you for maybe 50 in taxes, regardless of how they found out you earned that measly income.
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Are you going to report all your cash tips? Are you going to report that $100 sports bet you won? Are you going to report that $200 you won at casino? Get real.
 
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FLKeys

Well-Known Member
Let’s say that some random person began driving two weeks ago, hates it, and quits. This hypothetical person makes around $200 total, and gives less than 25 rides. What is the cheapest way this person can file taxes with minimal risk? What will Uber send to this hypothetical driver and what will Uber report to the IRS. Self employed tax software runs about $100 bucks and this hypothetical person was able to use free versions before, so what is the cheapest way this person can file taxes without taking any major risk?

Thanks.
Sign-up for Credit Karma, it's free and a good idea to keep track of your credit. They also have a free tax filing feature that you can use for filing your self employed return. Last year I keyed my information into their program and it came up exactly the same as my first tax return so it looks pretty accurate.
 

peteyvavs

Well-Known Member
Let’s say that some random person began driving two weeks ago, hates it, and quits. This hypothetical person makes around $200 total, and gives less than 25 rides. What is the cheapest way this person can file taxes with minimal risk? What will Uber send to this hypothetical driver and what will Uber report to the IRS. Self employed tax software runs about $100 bucks and this hypothetical person was able to use free versions before, so what is the cheapest way this person can file taxes without taking any major risk?

Thanks.
He wouldn’t need to file if it’s under 600 dollars
 

LADryver

Active Member
Don't include it in your taxes . If Uber does sent to IRS which they won't IRS will contact you what you will owe on $200. Would be nothing or$20 or less
Do not commit tax fraud, just saying. Unless something is not taxable then it gets included somewhere. Here is good news. Very simple. If you know the number of miles you traveled while available on the app, you take the federal mileage rate for that. On a schedule C put the 200 and the mileage deduction. At the bottom is your income. Carry it to report income from schedule c. You will not get a 1099. Follow instructions for schedule SE and file the form in your return.
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He wouldn’t need to file if it’s under 600 dollars
Incorrect. You won't get a 1099 under $600 but it is taxable.
 
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