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7000 Vegas Drivers?

stuber

Well-Known Member
I just read a Las Vegas Review-Journal article (No link here, SEARCH : uber news las Vegas and you'll find it) which states that UBER has applied for a business license in Vegas which would permit 7000 drivers to operate there. Really? 7000?

What a crock. How on earth do they think anyone can operate efficiently with 6999 other drivers competing in that market? Given it's size, Vegas has a lot of business, but that many drivers is complete nonsense.

UBER flooding is the modus operandi for these people. I've dropped out (for a variety of reasons) but oversaturating is probably the biggest reason. UBER ON dummies!
 

UberNorthStar

Well-Known Member
The Commission is going to let Uber slide w/o FBI background checks & drug test, all b/c those conditions will cause ppl to not sign up. :frown:
 

stuber

Well-Known Member
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #3
The Commission is going to let Uber slide w/o FBI background checks & drug test, all b/c those conditions will cause ppl to not sign up. :frown:
I suppose that means no physical as well. Terrific. Thousands of retirement age drivers who cannot pass a DOT exam competing in the same market with people who can. Way to go Vegas. That's leadership! That's safeguarding the public interest!
 

stuber

Well-Known Member
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #5
Here's the fix. States Rights nut-jobs get ready to scream and throw tantrums.

Federal Regulations that apply to any roadway within the US.

For hire vehicles of any description and the drivers of for hire vehicles shall be subject to:

FBI background checks.
DOT physicals and DOT operating rules.
Drug Screen.
Commercial Liability Insurance.
Compliance with all state and local regulations.

The FAA and NTSB/DOT ensure that airlines and trucking companies don't get away with skirting the rules wherever they operate, why should for hire passengers transportation be allowed local jurisdiction and rulemaking?

Localities are incapable of controlling the industry. That's pretty clear.

Illegitimate companies like UBER and all the other "gypsy" operators probably account for more than a third of all for hire transportation in the US. Who knows. But it is a very large percentage.

Federal law is required or the industry will completely cannibalize itself out of existence.
 

Micmac

Well-Known Member
I just read a Las Vegas Review-Journal article (No link here, SEARCH : uber news las Vegas and you'll find it) which states that UBER has applied for a business license in Vegas which would permit 7000 drivers to operate there. Really? 7000?

What a crock. How on earth do they think anyone can operate efficiently with 6999 other drivers competing in that market? Given it's size, Vegas has a lot of business, but that many drivers is complete nonsense.

UBER flooding is the modus operandi for these people. I've dropped out (for a variety of reasons) but oversaturating is probably the biggest reason. UBER ON dummies!
That s how those son of the b*ch do in every market.
They bribe to silence the officials so they can victimize
The drivers . You have 6 people going to the airport beside that you have 6000 drivers waiting for ping!!!what a scam .
 
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UberNorthStar

Well-Known Member
stuber said:
FBI background checks.
DOT physicals and DOT operating rules.
Drug Screen.
Commercial Liability Insurance.
Compliance with all state and local regulations.
stuber said:
Federal law is required or the industry will completely cannibalize itself out of existence.
As of now any person who holds the Houston TNC permit has had their fingerprints sent to the FBI for a background check, a DOT physical including drug test, and carries commercial liability insurance provided by Raiser, LLC.

"Compliance with all state and local regulations." Is something I will look into, mainly state.

Stuber, Where can I access the regulations you quoted?
 

Gemgirlla

Well-Known Member
Most recently, it seems to me that by allowing Uber and other TNC companies to get around these regulations is allowing these companies to profit greatly at the expense of the drivers. Rideshare companies sell TNC driving as a "good" option to make money but given the current low rates as well as the lack of any labor law protections and the insurance risk, drivers are actually being exploited and assuming a great deal of the costs and risks that would normally be borne by a company (which is one of the main reasons Uber's valuation is so high). Not having to cover all these costs and comply with regulations, also allows Uber to charge low fares and undercut the competition. If the government thinks it's a good thing for consumers to have cheap transportation, they should provide it. Not the People.

Perhaps TNC driving was a much better financial option when these companies first started and the rates where much higher. However, not anymore. Even worse, drivers often become too consumed with driving (especially now since it takes more hours driving to make the same or less money than in the past), too dependent on Uber earnings and thus, don't focus on looking for better, long term, sustainable work and/or careers.
 

GrandpaD

Well-Known Member
Slightly misleading...the Uber application is for the State of Nevada, not just Las Vegas. Granted, a large percentage of drivers may be in Vegas, but you also have to consider Reno, Tahoe, etc. Also, if you read the actual regulations (which still have to gain final approval on September 11) that number is for a maximum cumulative total of drivers over the first 24 months. So, 7,000 maximum also accounts for driver turn-over during the first 2 years statewide.
 
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stuber

Well-Known Member
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #10
Slightly misleading...the Uber application is for the State of Nevada, not just Las Vegas. Granted, a large percentage of drivers may be in Vegas, but you also have to consider Reno, Tahoe, etc. Also, if you read the actual regulations (which still have to gain final approval on September 11) that number is for a maximum cumulative total of drivers over the first 24 months. So, 7,000 maximum also accounts for driver turn-over during the first 2 years statewide.
Good point.
 

stuber

Well-Known Member
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #11
As of now any person who holds the Houston TNC permit has had their fingerprints sent to the FBI for a background check, a DOT physical including drug test, and carries commercial liability insurance provided by Raiser, LLC.

"Compliance with all state and local regulations." Is something I will look into, mainly state.

Stuber, Where can I access the regulations you quoted?
I wasn't quoting statues. Just saying that is how it SHOULD be. Fat chance.
 

TwoFiddyMile

Well-Known Member
Uber could care less if it floods the market.

In fact, that's the plan.
Uber would be thrilled if a crappy ping 20 minutes outside Oshkosh could be serviced in 3 minutes or less.
Uber doesn't care if you make a profit, only that THEY do.
 

stuber

Well-Known Member
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #14
Again UBER NORTH STAR,

I WASN'T QUOTING REGULATION. THERE IS NO FEDERAL REGULATION.

Just saying how it should be. The feds should have oversight in this business, because the localities cannot seem to handle it.
 

UberNorthStar

Well-Known Member
Hello, stuber!

Why are you repeating yourself? Too busy typing to see my second post was deleted within minutes of me posting it?
 

mrlasvegas

Active Member
I suppose that means no physical as well. Terrific. Thousands of retirement age drivers who cannot pass a DOT exam competing in the same market with people who can. Way to go Vegas. That's leadership! That's safeguarding the public interest!
It is worth considering that many of the drivers will be part time and quite a few will be CDL drivers. Many here in Vegas work 4 10 hour days. That leaves two days a week to work and stay legal. All CDL holders have an up to date medical card. I have a CDL but am exempt from hours of service as I work in the safety department as a field supervisor. There will not be 7000 drivers at a time. So much of the valley goes unserved by cabs now, demand will far exceed supply most of the time.
 

mrlasvegas

Active Member
Slightly misleading...the Uber application is for the State of Nevada, not just Las Vegas. Granted, a large percentage of drivers may be in Vegas, but you also have to consider Reno, Tahoe, etc. Also, if you read the actual regulations (which still have to gain final approval on September 11) that number is for a maximum cumulative total of drivers over the first 24 months. So, 7,000 maximum also accounts for driver turn-over during the first 2 years statewide.
Driver turn over is high in any transportation business. Where I work we start at 15.00 an hour, lots of OT, bonuses, and a Teamster benefits plan. Yet we still turn over a high percentage of our drivers.
 

stuber

Well-Known Member
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #18
It is worth considering that many of the drivers will be part time and quite a few will be CDL drivers. Many here in Vegas work 4 10 hour days. That leaves two days a week to work and stay legal. All CDL holders have an up to date medical card. I have a CDL but am exempt from hours of service as I work in the safety department as a field supervisor. There will not be 7000 drivers at a time. So much of the valley goes unserved by cabs now, demand will far exceed supply most of the time.
Good information. Thanks. Your point speaks volumes about the general trend that UBER is actively promoting. That is, a shift away from full time work.
 

limepro

Well-Known Member
It is worth considering that many of the drivers will be part time and quite a few will be CDL drivers. Many here in Vegas work 4 10 hour days. That leaves two days a week to work and stay legal. All CDL holders have an up to date medical card. I have a CDL but am exempt from hours of service as I work in the safety department as a field supervisor. There will not be 7000 drivers at a time. So much of the valley goes unserved by cabs now, demand will far exceed supply most of the time.
Exactly what I was going to state 7k max drivers not 7k 24/7, most drivers are part time and the ones that aren't will split the day. There are what 2k cabs in Vegas alone going 24/7?
 

stuber

Well-Known Member
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #20
Exactly what I was going to state 7k max drivers not 7k 24/7, most drivers are part time and the ones that aren't will split the day. There are what 2k cabs in Vegas alone going 24/7?
Hard to imagine that 2k full time cabs plus another 1k full time sedans (I'm guessing) plus the shuttle vans and bus companies are not enough to adequately service the city. To these full time services add in the existing part time service providers. Who knows how many they are? At any given time during any given day, there's probably already 5k " for hire" cars operating.

Somehow I don't think this addition of UBER is really about fulfilling an unmet need. Vegas just wants to " keep up" with the Jones' . Meanwhile, Vegas has failed to notice that the Jones' are driving off a cliff.
 
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