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188k 08 Nissan Altima (Engine Bay Picture)

Jay Dean

Well-Known Member
10B2751B-B545-4B13-B014-DF22B4FDBA8B.jpeg


Getting some ideas in what else to do at 188k 08 Nissan Altima - If nothing else I have learned quite a bit about cars (when I really didn’t have a clue) driving for U/L so there is that lol

Thanks!

Has new struts
New Engine coils
New Oil gasket (which was causing oil to enter coil number 1
New One (of three) mount replaced for engine, top left (called dog bone lol)
New wheel bearings
New door actuator
New door handle
New tires
New enough air filters - cabin and engine
New breaks and new rotors
Battery 6 months old

What is getting replaced this week
NEW positive connector to battery due to corrosion
New Power Steering pressure switch (causing leak)

——

Status
Sepitine belt is a few years old
Timing belt (if it has one) has NEVER been changed
I learned that flushing fluids in a vehicle this old is damaging...but curious anyones imput on fluids
Transmission works great or that is starts and drives with zero issues

One good thing about driving cars this old is I am getting parts at like 20% original cost, just because I believe they want to clear their stock of old crap...just guessing but it sure helps.
 
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losiglow

Well-Known Member
Wow. That's excellent for a Nissan. They're not like they used to be since Renault purchased them...

Are you asking if you should sell/upgrade? From a financial perspective, especially if doing U/L, I'd just keep on trucking with what you have.

As far as fluids, doing a drain and refill of the transmission fluid may be a good idea. However, if you've had the car for a really long time and have never done it, then leave it alone. Damage is already done and changing it will just remove the friction material floating around in the transmission which will likely cause slipping. If you've never changed the ATF, shame on you.
 

Jay Dean

Well-Known Member
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  • #3
Wow. That's excellent for a Nissan. They're not like they used to be since Renault purchased them...

Are you asking if you should sell/upgrade? From a financial perspective, especially if doing U/L, I'd just keep on trucking with what you have.

As far as fluids, doing a drain and refill of the transmission fluid may be a good idea. However, if you've had the car for a really long time and have never done it, then leave it alone. Damage is already done and changing it will just remove the friction material floating around in the transmission which will likely cause slipping. If you've never changed the ATF, shame on you.
Thanks for reply! Yes I have heard Nissan went downhill after some change, so that’s what it was Renault...interesting.

I am looking to see what else I may need to do to try one last push with this thing during the busy fall times where there is actually a chance to make some profit..even at these rates due to the insane amount of tourism, trying to get this old bird in the best shape possible if I decide to drive during the tourist season come September - October Thanks!

That and just generally like ideas what to do or not for my next car which will NOT be used for rideshare lol and also perhaps other drivers can learn a few things about their own engine by replies and seeing this thread and possibly know what to expect to happen over time.
 

losiglow

Well-Known Member
I'd probably just continue to do general maintenance like oil changes. If you're planning on getting rid of it in the next year, I wouldn't sink much money into it. Especially if it seems to be running fine.

As far as what to do with your next car - I'd keep up on the transmission fluid changes. A drain/refill is usually pretty easy and cheap if you're interested in learning how to do it. YouTube is your friend there. If you're not interested in DIY, mechanics usually charge about double what an oil change would cost. I do mine about every 15K miles but every 30K miles is fine. People neglect their transmission but statistically, more transmissions fail than engines in modern cars - and they're just as expensive to replace. Yet people don't pay attention to them until it's too late. Like engine oil, keeping the transmission fluid clean is the best thing you can do for it. For engine oil, I'd use synthetic. Even the cheapo Walmart brand synthetic (Supertech) oil is fine. Use a good filter like WIX or Mobil1. Stay away from FRAM and STP.

I'm a gearhead so I do all sorts of extra crap that I probably wouldn't recommend unless you're mechanically inclined. The old saying "if it ain't broken, don't fix it" applies here. However, changing spark plugs, cleaning sensors and other electronic contacts, cleaning battery terminals, replacing old suspension parts and doing an occasional carbon cleaning of the valves and pistons can go a long way in keeping the car feeling new. But again, unless you're somewhat mechanically inclined and want to learn that stuff, I'd probably leave it alone unless you actually experience a problem. There's a big difference between doing work to keep the car feeling new and just fixing things when something goes wrong.
 

charmer37

Well-Known Member
I just do deliveries but I have a 2006 Infiniti G35X, Good car with AWD and reliable. The only work I had to do was front end, Replace the radiator , Tires, Brakes, Replace a cam sensor and fluid changes. I do drain and fills for the transmission and I have 221,000 miles, Nissan/Infiniti made a strong 3.5 engine for this model....Keep up the maintenance as she will keep going😎
 

Diamondraider

Well-Known Member
I'd probably just continue to do general maintenance like oil changes. If you're planning on getting rid of it in the next year, I wouldn't sink much money into it. Especially if it seems to be running fine.

As far as what to do with your next car - I'd keep up on the transmission fluid changes. A drain/refill is usually pretty easy and cheap if you're interested in learning how to do it. YouTube is your friend there. If you're not interested in DIY, mechanics usually charge about double what an oil change would cost. I do mine about every 15K miles but every 30K miles is fine. People neglect their transmission but statistically, more transmissions fail than engines in modern cars - and they're just as expensive to replace. Yet people don't pay attention to them until it's too late. Like engine oil, keeping the transmission fluid clean is the best thing you can do for it. For engine oil, I'd use synthetic. Even the cheapo Walmart brand synthetic (Supertech) oil is fine. Use a good filter like WIX or Mobil1. Stay away from FRAM and STP.

I'm a gearhead so I do all sorts of extra crap that I probably wouldn't recommend unless you're mechanically inclined. The old saying "if it ain't broken, don't fix it" applies here. However, changing spark plugs, cleaning sensors and other electronic contacts, cleaning battery terminals, replacing old suspension parts and doing an occasional carbon cleaning of the valves and pistons can go a long way in keeping the car feeling new. But again, unless you're somewhat mechanically inclined and want to learn that stuff, I'd probably leave it alone unless you actually experience a problem. There's a big difference between doing work to keep the car feeling new and just fixing things when something goes wrong.
Maybe you can help with an Altima question (2016)

When I start the vehicle cold, I get a whiny sound that increases with rpm’s

Jiffy lube told me all fluids look good, but I just found out JL can’t even check my CVT transmission fluid.

Thoughts?
 

losiglow

Well-Known Member
The 3.5L was a good engine. He has the 2.5L 4-cylinder based on the photo of the engine bay. I'm surprised he got 188K out of that engine. It was kind of a piece of crap. It was notorious for oil consumption and catalytic converter issues.

I'd check the Nissan forums for mechanical questions. But as a start, does the sound increase only when the car is moving or does it do it even when stopped or in park? If it does it when stopped, it could be the serpentine belt. If it's when it's moving, it could be quite a few things. I'd first check the belt by adding a few drops of water on the belt while the engine is running. Then rev it up a bit. If the sound goes away, it's the belt. It will come right back of course, since the water only acts as a very short term lubricant. You can attempt to use some belt conditioner or replace it with a Goodyear Gatorback belt which is designed to eliminate belt noise.
 

Jay Dean

Well-Known Member
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  • #8
The 3.5L was a good engine. He has the 2.5L 4-cylinder based on the photo of the engine bay. I'm surprised he got 188K out of that engine. It was kind of a piece of crap. It was notorious for oil consumption and catalytic converter issues.

I'd check the Nissan forums for mechanical questions. But as a start, does the sound increase only when the car is moving or does it do it even when stopped or in park? If it does it when stopped, it could be the serpentine belt. If it's when it's moving, it could be quite a few things. I'd first check the belt by adding a few drops of water on the belt while the engine is running. Then rev it up a bit. If the sound goes away, it's the belt. It will come right back of course, since the water only acts as a very short term lubricant. You can attempt to use some belt conditioner or replace it with a Goodyear Gatorback belt which is designed to eliminate belt noise.
Not to alter the subject on Altima but I owned a Toyota 4-runner and the thing was absolutely amazing, basically bulletproof..would you say Toyota still holds true to that quality standard? If not Toyota what’s another brand that is “Solid” in your opinion, not to take up too much of your time but since your offering advice! I’ll def ask!:smiles:

Thanks and editing title of thread to Engine bay pic by your reply!
 
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amazinghl

Well-Known Member
The 2.5L uses timing chain, not belt. Keep you the oil lever and you should be fine, until it makes noises then get it checked out ASAP.
Change the transmission fluid.
Change the coolant.
Change the oil.
Change the air filter.
Change the cabin filter.
Clean your corroded battery terminal or change it.
 

Jay Dean

Well-Known Member
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #10
The 2.5L uses timing chain, not belt. Keep you the oil lever and you should be fine, until it makes noises then get it checked out ASAP.
Change the transmission fluid.
Change the coolant.
Change the oil.
Change the air filter.
Change the cabin filter.
Clean your corroded battery terminal or change it.
Yes changing the positive terminal this week! Awesome reply about timing chain..thanks man, some reason I overheard in past I don’t have a timing belt so that makes sense! I keep hearing that changing transmission fluid this late in the game does more hard than good so I’m leaving it be until it’s ready for junkyard lol. Not sure about coolant? I think that sounds like a great idea...filters changed..not sure if I should change breake fluid or not or leave be...thanks!
 
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amazinghl

Well-Known Member
I keep hearing that changing transmission fluid this late in the game does more hard than good so I’m leaving it be until it’s ready for junkyard lol.
Well, if the transmission is on its last leg, it'll die regardless what fluid is in it. If the transmission is healthy, changing the fluid can only extend its life. Never flush, just drain and fill.
 

Jay Dean

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  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #12
Well, if the transmission is on its last leg, it'll die regardless what fluid is in it. If the transmission is healthy, changing the fluid can only extend its life. Never flush, just drain and fill.
Awesome I never knew, I suppose I thought a flush was doing that...a flush moves fluids around within the transmission and a drain and fill replaces? I know sounds like a stupid question but I really do not know. I have my master mechanic friend but he is too busy and I don’t have all these questions ready to go, this thread is perfect to understanding without rushing for advice, thank you
 

Jay Dean

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  • #14
Brake fluid is cheap, if you know how to bleed, change it.
I can change my breaks (finally learned on own) don’t know how to bleed them, I can pay my mechanic friend to do it, just need to know if it is needed...or should fluid be changed etc at 188k I know I never changed the fluid myself or ever paid anyone to do it, ever lol
 

Amsoil Uber Connect

Well-Known Member
How about if just Clean the engine bay.

Spray a little chain lube on the Batt terminals prevents oxidation.

Find a Consumer Reports Used car buying guide. Very telling.

Thanks about Renault buying Nissan.

Plus 1 on, Wix X/P filters. Amsoil's alternative
 
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amazinghl

Well-Known Member
I can change my breaks (finally learned on own) don’t know how to bleed them, I can pay my mechanic friend to do it, just need to know if it is needed...or should fluid be changed etc at 188k I know I never changed the fluid myself or ever paid anyone to do it, ever lol

 

Toocutetofail

Well-Known Member
2006 honda civic... :cryin:

transmission
catalytic converter
alternator
cv joint
struts, shocks
water pump
timing chain kit
ac compressor
replaced rear bench seat after someone had diahria
ball joints

and brakes pads, rotors, fluids
lots of used tires @ $20 installed

best thing about this car, I can park it anywhere. With my new 2019 Hybrid Toyota Camry I won't even let my dirty, filthy, smelly kids, husband in the car from the park. lol.
 

Amsoil Uber Connect

Well-Known Member
Well, if the transmission is on its last leg, it'll die regardless what fluid is in it. If the transmission is healthy, changing the fluid can only extend its life. Never flush, just drain and fill.
Drain and fill is just the half of it. You leave the other half of it in the converter.

A complete change is undoing the line to the Radiator. I'm not going into the whole procedure here.

Simple Green is not good. As it's Caustic. 1. able to burn or corrode organic tissue by chemical action.
 
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Jay Dean

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  • #20
2006 honda civic... :cryin:

transmission
catalytic converter
alternator
cv joint
struts, shocks
water pump
timing chain kit
ac compressor
replaced rear bench seat after someone had diahria
ball joints

and brakes pads, rotors, fluids
lots of used tires @ $20 installed

best thing about this car, I can park it anywhere. With my new 2019 Hybrid Toyota Camry I won't even let my dirty, filthy, smelly kids, husband in the car from the park. lol.
Hey, you learned about all this through your 06 Honda Civic? Sounds like you run a tight ship with that Toyota now LOL...I miss my Toyota 4-Runner
 
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