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Christinebitg

Well-Known Member
He said he didn't speak english.
My father's first language was German. He's about 5th generation in this country.

I was in a jury pool in Los Angeles County, when I used to live there. One of the prospective jurors was a guy who had immigrated from Cambodia, and had become a US citizen. He got himself excused, because he said he wasn't confident enough in his English to be sure he could understand everything that went on in a trial. I can only imagine the horrors he may have seen in the past.

I used to work with a guy in a refinery who was a former South Vietnamese fighter pilot. He was one of the hardest working people I've ever met. He was working full time and also going to school full time for an engineering degree. One of his kids was born in a refugee camp in southern California.

As you might imagine, I don't lose a lot of sleep over what languages people speak.
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Oh, I forgot one. I was working for a few days in a chemical plant in Venezuela. I speak about two dozen words of Spanish, and I'm not sure I could make more than about two sentences out of them. People there were very nice to me. Most of what I said in English, they understood. When necessary for some of my meetings, someone would interpret, either one direction or the other. (The situation there is very bad now, and I worry about the people that I worked with.)
 
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BigRedDriver

Well-Known Member
My father's first language was German. He's about 5th generation in this country.

I was in a jury pool in Los Angeles County, when I used to live there. One of the prospective jurors was a guy who had immigrated from Cambodia, and had become a US citizen. He got himself excused, because he said he wasn't confident enough in his English to be sure he could understand everything that went on in a trial. I can only imagine the horrors he may have seen in the past.

I used to work with a guy in a refinery who was a former South Vietnamese fighter pilot. He was one of the hardest working people I've ever met. He was working full time and also going to school full time for an engineering degree. One of his kids was born in a refugee camp in southern California.

As you might imagine, I don't lose a lot of sleep over what languages people speak.
Post automatically merged:

Oh, I forgot one. I was working for a few days in a chemical plant in Venezuela. I speak about two dozen words of Spanish, and I'm not sure I could make more than about two sentences out of them. People there were very nice to me. Most of what I said in English, they understood. When necessary for some of my meetings, someone would interpret, either one direction or the other. (The situation there is very bad now, and I worry about the people that I worked with.)
Wait, your father is 5th generation in this country and German is his first language?

Huh?
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He said he didn't speak english.

I'm in Miami Beach this week for holidays. If you don't speak the dominant language of your country, don't get a job interacting with the travelling public.
I’ve heard this complaint from many riders and several told me they did not feel safe driving with someone they couldn’t communicate with.
 

Christinebitg

Well-Known Member
Wait, your father is 5th generation in this country and German is his first language?
Yes, he grew up in the town of New Bremen, Ohio.

He doesn't know much German any more. He only speaks English now.

His father served in the US Army in World War I. His first letter home to his wife from France was written in German. He captured a squad of German soldiers, in part because of his knowledge of German. He later sponsored one of them to move to the US.
 

Another Uber Driver

Well-Known Member
Moderator
The "dominant language" in South Florida isn't English.
English, Spanish and French are about the same, there.

English-Americans
Spanish-Cubans and Puerto Ricans as well as other Central Americans.
French-Snowbirds from Canada and Northern Vermont/New Hampshire/Maine as well as Haitians.

I can walk down a block in Miami and see signs in English, Spanish and French.
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Not sure if OP is ..................a troll whose bait you all took.
I can assure you that Original Poster is not a troll.
 

BigRedDriver

Well-Known Member
Yes, he grew up in the town of New Bremen, Ohio.

He doesn't know much German any more. He only speaks English now.

His father served in the US Army in World War I. His first letter home to his wife from France was written in German. He captured a squad of German soldiers, in part because of his knowledge of German. He later sponsored one of them to move to the US.
Oh, it was his first language, not anymore. Got it
 

Christinebitg

Well-Known Member
Oh, it was his first language, not anymore. Got it
Yes, that's correct.

But if you want a strange language... the other side of my family has some German Catholics in it. When they started praying in Latin, it was very different.

That was back when their Church said that it wasn't effective if you said that same stuff in "the vernacular," meaning whatever language was local, depending on where you were.
 

BigRedDriver

Well-Known Member
Yes, that's correct.

But if you want a strange language... the other side of my family has some German Catholics in it. When they started praying in Latin, it was very different.

That was back when their Church said that it wasn't effective if you said that same stuff in "the vernacular," meaning whatever language was local, depending on where you were.
I learned the Mass in Latin as an alter boy. Right before I was to do the first Mass, they changed the mass to English. THANK GOD!
 

Another Uber Driver

Well-Known Member
Moderator
I learned the Mass in Latin as an alter boy. Right before I was to do the first Mass, they changed the mass to English. THANK GOD!
We had the Latin Mass. I went to a Catholic high school. The school required us to study Latin. Then they changed it to English. Just when I had figured out what they were saying. Before that, I thought that the Priest was saying:

"I can beat you at dominoes"
"Take it or leave it, it's eggnog"

I went to a Jesuit high school (actually, two). The taught the "reformed" or "classical" pronunciation of Latin. The Catholic church uses an Italian pronunciation. Several of the parishes still have one Latin Mass every Sunday. There was this one where the regular Cantor went on vacation, so the pastor asked me to serve as Cantor for two weeks. After the first Mass, he remarked that I had a funny way of pronouncing Latin, but, as I seemed to know what I was doing, he would accept it. I did explain myself, and he allowed that he had heard that the Jesuits teach Latin that way.
 

BigRedDriver

Well-Known Member
We had the Latin Mass. I went to a Catholic high school. The school required us to study Latin. Then they changed it to English. Just when I had figured out what they were saying. Before that, I thought that the Priest was saying:

"I can beat you at dominoes"
"Take it or leave it, it's eggnog"

I went to a Jesuit high school (actually, two). The taught the "reformed" or "classical" pronunciation of Latin. The Catholic church uses an Italian pronunciation. Several of the parishes still have one Latin Mass every Sunday. There was this one where the regular Cantor went on vacation, so the pastor asked me to serve as Cantor for two weeks. After the first Mass, he remarked that I had a funny way of pronouncing Latin, but, as I seemed to know what I was doing, he would accept it. I did explain myself, and he allowed that he had heard that the Jesuits teach Latin that way.
I think Cheech and Chong did something about the Latin Mass (might have been a Sister Mary Elephant skit) where the chant was.......

O feely me boney belly.
 
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