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1) I hate MLMs; 2) I signed up to drive for Tryp; and 3) I am not a hypocrite.

1) I hate MLMs; 2) I signed up to drive for Tryp; and 3) I am not a hypocrite.

If you are already familiar with the new rideshare company Tryp, then you know they use MLM (Multi-Level Marketing) to recruit drivers to their rideshare platform. So how can I state both #1 and #2 without being a hypocrite?

The reason I hate MLMs is not because they are MLMs. I hate them because of why people who become MLM sales reps fail. In fact, the reason I signed up to drive for Tryp is because Tryp avoids that same why that causes drivers to fail on Uber and Lyft.


Uber and Lyft drivers suffer from the same problem MLM sales reps do.


The biggest reason people who join up to sell for MLMs fail is because the market gets saturated with sales reps for the MLM. If you were the only sales rep in town for the MLM you joined, you’d have a pretty good chance at succeeding as a sales rep for the MLM (assuming it’s a decent product or service). But when your neighbor is also a sales rep for the same MLM, the woman across the street is too, five people on the next block also are, two dozen in the apartment complex around the corner are too, etc, etc…. then it’s close to impossible for any sales rep of the MLM to succeed, except for those at the top that recruited so well that they created the saturation now being experienced by those below them.

In a nutshell, when there’s another one just like you on every street corner, you are highly likely to fail as an MLM sales rep.

Let me say that again, as you can’t miss this point… when there’s another one just like you on every street corner, you are highly likely to fail as an MLM sales rep.

Does that sound familiar? It should. If you are an Uber/Lyft driver this should be hitting home with you, because unless you drive for Uber/Lyft in some remote area, you’ve experienced that exact same issue in the cities Uber and Lyft operates in. And if you haven’t…. just wait. The gig seems great for a while, and then all the sudden you can’t make half of what you were before, because there are drivers online everywhere. This is a big reason why Uber has as high as 96% of their drivers quit within a year of starting to drive (see CNBC.com: https://www.cnbc.com/2017/04/20/only-4-percent-of-uber-drivers-remain-after-a-year-says-report.html).


99% fail… 96% quit… Tomato…. ToMAHto….


Similarly speaking, FTC studies have shown that as many as 99% of people who join MLMs as sales reps fail (see FTC.gov: https://www.ftc.gov/sites/default/files/documents/public_comments/trade-regulation-rule-disclosure-requirements-and-prohibitions-concerning-business-opportunities-ftc.r511993-00010 /00010-57283.pdf). So…. MLM sales rep…. Uber driver…. one on every street corner…. 99% fail…. 96% quit…. Are you seeing the comparison here?

Forget that a driver is a completely different job than being a sales rep. Because It’s not the type of job that matters. Also forget that Uber and Lyft are not MLMs. Because it’s not the type of company that matters. It’s the over-saturated market conditions that matter.

If it looks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it probably is a duck. Being a sales rep in an over-saturated market is a duck. Being an Uber/Lyft driver in an over-saturated market is a duck. They are both ducks, because over-saturation sucks. The model MLMs use naturally results in over-saturation of their sales reps, and the model Uber and Lyft use naturally result in over-saturation of their drivers. So, the reason I hate MLMs is the exact same reason I hate Uber and Lyft. Their business models both naturally result in over-saturation.


Doesn’t that make Tryp twice as bad?


So now, you might be thinking, wouldn’t that make Tryp twice as bad? Isn’t it just combining the Uber model with an MLM model?

For the driver, the answer is clearly no, for two reasons: 1) Tryp’s subscription-based service fee model avoids the problem that both Uber and Lyft’s models suffer from that results in the over-saturation of drivers on their platforms; and 2) Tryp drivers don’t have to be MLM sales reps… Tryp drivers can just be drivers.


How does Tryp avoid driver over-saturation?


Drivers have been asking Uber and Lyft for years to either put a limit on the number of drivers that can sign up, or a limit on the number of drivers that can be online at the same time. Such limits would be very similar to what cities have done for decades, where they limit the number of taxi licenses, sometimes called medallions. In New York city, one taxi medallion was worth nearly $1 million to the person that owned it. This is because limits create scarcity, which results in value. It’s a simple economic principle. Government created these limits because without them so many taxis became available, it reduced the value of their services so much that the taxi drivers couldn’t make a living (a situation very similar to why 96% of drivers Uber drivers quit within a year).


What the drivers are asking Uber and Lyft to do would also be like limitations some other driving gig apps have, like Doordash, where a Doordash delivery driver can’t logon to be available to accept deliveries unless the app is allowing more drivers to logon in an area.


However, Uber and Lyft benefit from the over-saturation of drivers on their platforms. When it’s occurring, riders get matched to a driver closer and quicker than they would if the market was not over-saturated with drivers, which reduces the chances of the potential rider using the other platform to get a ride. So, Uber and Lyft have absolutely zero reason to do anything about this. They would never add a feature to their platform that creates such a limit unless some serious market condition, or government regulation forced them to.


Tryp on the other hand doesn’t even need to add such a feature. The subscription-based service fee model Tryp uses naturally results in limitation. According to Uber, around half of Uber drivers drive for Uber for less than 10 hours per week (see Fastcompany.com: https://www.fastcompany.com/90240917/driving-for-uber-and-lyft-full-time-is-getting-harder). That means that around half of Uber drivers would not sign up to drive for Tryp, because they don’t drive enough to benefit from Tryp’s once a month $199 service fee subscription model. The full time Uber drivers who are having $1000+ in service fees taken from their fares will love only having to only pay $199 in service fees instead of $1000+. But for most drivers who drive less than 10 hours per week, the $199 monthly Tryp service fee would cost them more than the total service fees Uber is currently taking from their fares every month. Thus, they won’t drive for Tryp.


A subscription fee is a barrier to entry… a limitation.


That is what is called a “barrier to entry”. The barrier limits the number of people who enter. Tryp doesn’t have to create a feature on the platform to limit the number of drivers, because their $199 barrier to entry does that naturally. So, if all existing rideshare riders are potential Tryp riders, but only half of existing rideshare drivers are potential Tryp drivers, Tryp is naturally going to have a healthier rider to driver ratio on their platform compared to Uber and Lyft, as Tryp establishes its presence in the rideshare market.


In fact, to the driver it doesn’t even matter what share of the rideshare market Tryp gets. In other words, the question “will Tryp get enough riders”, while being important to the owners of Tryp, is somewhat meaningless to the drivers. Uber could get a million ride requests in day, but if there are a million drivers online that day, every Uber driver is going to average 1 ride a day. That’s what over-saturation does. To the drivers, it’s not the volume of riders a platform gets. It’s the ratio of riders to drivers on the platform that matters. A healthier ratio is less saturated with drivers, which results in more ride requests getting assigned to drivers on the platform.


If Tryp gets as little as 2% of riders and 1% of drivers in the rideshare market to switch, Tryp drivers benefit from a rider to driver ratio that’s twice as healthy as they what they experience on Uber and Lyft. And if Tryp gets as much as 30% of riders and 15% of drivers to switch Tryp drivers still have a rider to driver ratio that’s twice as healthy. So regardless of what share of the rideshare market Tryp gets, Tryp drivers get the same ratio benefit. So, drivers in the first month of Tryp’s existence can expect the same ratio benefit produced by the $199/month barrier to entry as Tryp drivers in the 10th year of Tryp’s existence, despite how much smaller Tryp would be in their 1st month than they would be in year 10.


It's the subscription model, not the company, that is great.


I’ve said I hate a few things so far. I said I hate MLMs. I said I hate Uber and Lyft. I said I hate over-saturation, and the reasons that lead to over-saturation. All that hate leads me to love a subscription based rideshare model. That doesn’t mean I love Tryp. That means I love the subscription-based model they’re using. If some other new rideshare company started with this same subscription-based model, I’d love it too. It’s the model, not the company that uses it, that makes it great.


Why being an MLM has no impact on drivers.


But Tryp is still an MLM, so drivers will fail because of that right?


Wrong (doing my best Trump speaking into the mic impression).

trump2.gif



Tryp drivers are NOT MLM sales reps. When you are a Tryp driver and you logon to Tryp’s website, you will see an “upgrade” tab. When you view that tab, you will see them advertising to you to upgrade to what they call an “Influencer”, and how much it costs you to upgrade. An influencer is a sales rep. They receive compensation via commissions, residual income and bonuses for successfully selling the Tryp platform to drivers, none of which a non-Influencer Tryp driver qualifies for. And yes, it is an MLM model, making a Tryp influencer an MLM sales rep.


And everything I’ve said about the MLM model resulting in the market being saturated with sales reps holds 100% true here. The FTC study (linked above) that show that 99% of MLM sales reps fails is applicable here. 99% of Tryp influencers will probably fail (probably fewer than that in the beginning, but over time it will naturally climb that high because saturation in inevitable in the model). Even if Tryp influencers are ten times more successful than other MLM sales reps, that still means 90% will fail. So, unless you really, really, REALLY believe you can succeed, and are willing to take the effort to execute it, then don’t waste your time, money, and effort on upgrading to a Tryp Influencer. It’s just that simple. Just say no…. and just drive for Tryp.


Sometimes you just gotta commit in order to try


My dream would be a rideshare company that uses a subscription-based service fee model without also being an MLM. But I can’t earn a living in my dreams. So, in reality I do what’s best for me. And in reality, the rideshare company offering the best rideshare model for a driver that does 10+ hours per week is Tryp. So, I’m signed up to drive for Tryp, and can’t wait for them to launch in my city. That said, I still have concerns. After a month or two, I could learn to hate their app. It’s possible. I’m not ignoring the possibility of problems when they do finally launch. But Uber and Lyft are so bad at what they are right now that I am willing to give Tryp a try. I am hoping for something better. As the character Andy Dufresne said in the movie The Shawskank Redemption, “Remember Red, hope is a good thing, maybe the best of things, and no good thing ever dies.” To me that means that even if Tryp fails, I will still have hope that something better than Uber and Lyft comes along, and that hope is a good thing.


So, if Tryp needs drivers to commit before they launch, then part of my hope and willingness to try them includes me stepping up to make that commitment. Maybe I am unique in that way. Uber and Lyft have driven me (pun intended) to try many different things due to my hope (Doordash, Postmates, Grubhub, Amazon Flex, Field Agent, Mobee, Gigwalk, Easyshift, Stringr, Roadie, etc, etc..). My hope includes hoping that my market gets enough drivers like me willing to commit to Tryp so they launch, and we can then all get to see what they can do for us.


So that’s how I can state that I hate MLMs, that I am signed up to drive for Try, and not be a hypocrite.


In fact, I’m kind of looking forward to a time when Tryp’s influencers reach the over-saturation point. I’m sure I’ll pull up to a red light and look over to see a 5 hour per week Uber driver parked next to a Tryp influencer standing on the curb who was trying to get the driver to sign up for a model that would never work for them. Then the driver will say, “I wish you were cheaper, ‘cause I can’t seem to get any riders”. To which the influencer will say, “Yeah, I can’t find any new Tryp drivers either”. As the light turns green, I will say to them both, “Yeah, over-saturation sucks, don’t it”, as I pull away to drive to my next Tryp pickup as a Tryp driver. I might even buy a microphone so I can drop it on the road before I pull away.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Comments

JqYork

Active Member
Uber, Lyft and Tryp all charge the driver service fees.

Uber and Lyft do it as a "pay as you go" model.
Yes, Uber & Lyft do it pay as you go. BUT, you pay them AFTER they have proven to you that they can get you some trips. Tryp wants you to pay them BEFORE they've even shown they have any passengers! Stoopid.

If Tryp were legit - and they wanted to do a subscription model - they'd offer dryvers to dryve a month for free. That way dryvers would be able to see that they actually had trips and that they could actually make money.

By the way, I love the Y thing y'all did. That's really innovative and unique - just like Lyft!

And what about Tryp's founder & CEO Robert McNulty? What a scammer! I love the way he portrays himself on his own website - like such a hero. http://www.robertmcnulty.com/

But does he mention there any of the financial frauds and crimes he was penalized for by the SEC years ago? Here's the real McNulty - straight from the pages of the Securities & Exchange Commission (SEC) under whose regulatory guidance, his crimes fell:

In a complaint filed by the Commission on September
30, 1994, McNulty was charged with orchestrating a complex scheme
to defraud investors by using the proceeds of securities
offerings by HQOS, HQOI, Auto Giant and Auto Depot to finance the
operations of affiliated companies and the companies' underwriter
and market maker, Global America, Inc., rather than for the
stated purpose of funding the issuers' operations.

In connection with this scheme, McNulty and the other
defendants caused false and misleading registration statements
and annual and quarterly reports to be filed with the Commission,
caused the companies' books and records to be false, and made
false statements to the companies' auditors with respect to
certain intercompany loans, transfers and advances. McNulty also
failed to file required reports with the Commission concerning
his beneficial ownership of securities issued by Auto Depot. The
Court also ordered McNulty to disgorge ill-gotten gains of
$70,000.00,

LINK HERE.

And in case that is not clear enough, here's a guy who has tracked McNulty's crimes and frauds over the years with a fuller explanation.

So we have an MLM which are ALWAYS scammy and suspect... run by a former con artist. Hmm... yep, I don't see anything to worry about here.
 
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goneubering

Well-Known Member
Obviously this has a lot of red flags. It's not even legally considered an MLM pyramid scheme because it doesn't have a product yet! Ride share guy posted a good article on Tryp.

Neither what was posted here or what is in the article I reference give any insight into how Tryp is actually going to grow a customer base. What is even the order. In DC we hit 5000 paying drivers, what happens next? Building a customer base is really expensive, that is really where rideshare companies burn a lot of money. Nothing in their strategy really speaks to customer acquisition.

I would beware until they actually have an operational city where drivers can share their experience with how busy it is and how the model is working.
My guess is they’re counting on the drivers to recruit passengers.
 

BigBadDriver

Well-Known Member
Re: merchant accounts

Every driver will be paying the merchant account rates which will remove 2-6% from your earnings.
Riders will do and say anything to get a free ride. Charge backs will be a huge issue. 2-6%? No way. It'll be way higher than that.
My guess is they’re counting on the drivers to recruit passengers.
Yep, just like Juno in New York.
 

peteyvavs

Well-Known Member
My claims were wrong? Please explain.

Does not Tryp charge the driver a weekly fee, a few not reflected by the fares you collect?

Does not Tryp have the driver collect the fare? How else can the driver collect the entire fare? Who takes the loss if the charge is later declined?

Does not Tryp promise continuing payments linked to referrals - both passenger and driver - you bring into the system? That's a basic part of every pyramid scheme.

Does Trip provide insurance, or not?

Inquiring minds want to know
A pyramid scheme by any other name is still a pyramid scheme.
 

MiamiKid

Well-Known Member
1) I hate MLMs; 2) I signed up to drive for Tryp; and 3) I am not a hypocrite.

If you are already familiar with the new rideshare company Tryp, then you know they use MLM (Multi-Level Marketing) to recruit drivers to their rideshare platform. So how can I state both #1 and #2 without being a hypocrite?

The reason I hate MLMs is not because they are MLMs. I hate them because of why people who become MLM sales reps fail. In fact, the reason I signed up to drive for Tryp is because Tryp avoids that same why that causes drivers to fail on Uber and Lyft.


Uber and Lyft drivers suffer from the same problem MLM sales reps do.


The biggest reason people who join up to sell for MLMs fail is because the market gets saturated with sales reps for the MLM. If you were the only sales rep in town for the MLM you joined, you’d have a pretty good chance at succeeding as a sales rep for the MLM (assuming it’s a decent product or service). But when your neighbor is also a sales rep for the same MLM, the woman across the street is too, five people on the next block also are, two dozen in the apartment complex around the corner are too, etc, etc…. then it’s close to impossible for any sales rep of the MLM to succeed, except for those at the top that recruited so well that they created the saturation now being experienced by those below them.

In a nutshell, when there’s another one just like you on every street corner, you are highly likely to fail as an MLM sales rep.

Let me say that again, as you can’t miss this point… when there’s another one just like you on every street corner, you are highly likely to fail as an MLM sales rep.

Does that sound familiar? It should. If you are an Uber/Lyft driver this should be hitting home with you, because unless you drive for Uber/Lyft in some remote area, you’ve experienced that exact same issue in the cities Uber and Lyft operates in. And if you haven’t…. just wait. The gig seems great for a while, and then all the sudden you can’t make half of what you were before, because there are drivers online everywhere. This is a big reason why Uber has as high as 96% of their drivers quit within a year of starting to drive (see CNBC.com: https://www.cnbc.com/2017/04/20/only-4-percent-of-uber-drivers-remain-after-a-year-says-report.html).


99% fail… 96% quit… Tomato…. ToMAHto….


Similarly speaking, FTC studies have shown that as many as 99% of people who join MLMs as sales reps fail (see FTC.gov: https://www.ftc.gov/sites/default/files/documents/public_comments/trade-regulation-rule-disclosure-requirements-and-prohibitions-concerning-business-opportunities-ftc.r511993-00010 /00010-57283.pdf). So…. MLM sales rep…. Uber driver…. one on every street corner…. 99% fail…. 96% quit…. Are you seeing the comparison here?

Forget that a driver is a completely different job than being a sales rep. Because It’s not the type of job that matters. Also forget that Uber and Lyft are not MLMs. Because it’s not the type of company that matters. It’s the over-saturated market conditions that matter.

If it looks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it probably is a duck. Being a sales rep in an over-saturated market is a duck. Being an Uber/Lyft driver in an over-saturated market is a duck. They are both ducks, because over-saturation sucks. The model MLMs use naturally results in over-saturation of their sales reps, and the model Uber and Lyft use naturally result in over-saturation of their drivers. So, the reason I hate MLMs is the exact same reason I hate Uber and Lyft. Their business models both naturally result in over-saturation.


Doesn’t that make Tryp twice as bad?


So now, you might be thinking, wouldn’t that make Tryp twice as bad? Isn’t it just combining the Uber model with an MLM model?

For the driver, the answer is clearly no, for two reasons: 1) Tryp’s subscription-based service fee model avoids the problem that both Uber and Lyft’s models suffer from that results in the over-saturation of drivers on their platforms; and 2) Tryp drivers don’t have to be MLM sales reps… Tryp drivers can just be drivers.


How does Tryp avoid driver over-saturation?


Drivers have been asking Uber and Lyft for years to either put a limit on the number of drivers that can sign up, or a limit on the number of drivers that can be online at the same time. Such limits would be very similar to what cities have done for decades, where they limit the number of taxi licenses, sometimes called medallions. In New York city, one taxi medallion was worth nearly $1 million to the person that owned it. This is because limits create scarcity, which results in value. It’s a simple economic principle. Government created these limits because without them so many taxis became available, it reduced the value of their services so much that the taxi drivers couldn’t make a living (a situation very similar to why 96% of drivers Uber drivers quit within a year).


What the drivers are asking Uber and Lyft to do would also be like limitations some other driving gig apps have, like Doordash, where a Doordash delivery driver can’t logon to be available to accept deliveries unless the app is allowing more drivers to logon in an area.


However, Uber and Lyft benefit from the over-saturation of drivers on their platforms. When it’s occurring, riders get matched to a driver closer and quicker than they would if the market was not over-saturated with drivers, which reduces the chances of the potential rider using the other platform to get a ride. So, Uber and Lyft have absolutely zero reason to do anything about this. They would never add a feature to their platform that creates such a limit unless some serious market condition, or government regulation forced them to.


Tryp on the other hand doesn’t even need to add such a feature. The subscription-based service fee model Tryp uses naturally results in limitation. According to Uber, around half of Uber drivers drive for Uber for less than 10 hours per week (see Fastcompany.com: https://www.fastcompany.com/90240917/driving-for-uber-and-lyft-full-time-is-getting-harder). That means that around half of Uber drivers would not sign up to drive for Tryp, because they don’t drive enough to benefit from Tryp’s once a month $199 service fee subscription model. The full time Uber drivers who are having $1000+ in service fees taken from their fares will love only having to only pay $199 in service fees instead of $1000+. But for most drivers who drive less than 10 hours per week, the $199 monthly Tryp service fee would cost them more than the total service fees Uber is currently taking from their fares every month. Thus, they won’t drive for Tryp.


A subscription fee is a barrier to entry… a limitation.


That is what is called a “barrier to entry”. The barrier limits the number of people who enter. Tryp doesn’t have to create a feature on the platform to limit the number of drivers, because their $199 barrier to entry does that naturally. So, if all existing rideshare riders are potential Tryp riders, but only half of existing rideshare drivers are potential Tryp drivers, Tryp is naturally going to have a healthier rider to driver ratio on their platform compared to Uber and Lyft, as Tryp establishes its presence in the rideshare market.


In fact, to the driver it doesn’t even matter what share of the rideshare market Tryp gets. In other words, the question “will Tryp get enough riders”, while being important to the owners of Tryp, is somewhat meaningless to the drivers. Uber could get a million ride requests in day, but if there are a million drivers online that day, every Uber driver is going to average 1 ride a day. That’s what over-saturation does. To the drivers, it’s not the volume of riders a platform gets. It’s the ratio of riders to drivers on the platform that matters. A healthier ratio is less saturated with drivers, which results in more ride requests getting assigned to drivers on the platform.


If Tryp gets as little as 2% of riders and 1% of drivers in the rideshare market to switch, Tryp drivers benefit from a rider to driver ratio that’s twice as healthy as they what they experience on Uber and Lyft. And if Tryp gets as much as 30% of riders and 15% of drivers to switch Tryp drivers still have a rider to driver ratio that’s twice as healthy. So regardless of what share of the rideshare market Tryp gets, Tryp drivers get the same ratio benefit. So, drivers in the first month of Tryp’s existence can expect the same ratio benefit produced by the $199/month barrier to entry as Tryp drivers in the 10th year of Tryp’s existence, despite how much smaller Tryp would be in their 1st month than they would be in year 10.


It's the subscription model, not the company, that is great.


I’ve said I hate a few things so far. I said I hate MLMs. I said I hate Uber and Lyft. I said I hate over-saturation, and the reasons that lead to over-saturation. All that hate leads me to love a subscription based rideshare model. That doesn’t mean I love Tryp. That means I love the subscription-based model they’re using. If some other new rideshare company started with this same subscription-based model, I’d love it too. It’s the model, not the company that uses it, that makes it great.


Why being an MLM has no impact on drivers.


But Tryp is still an MLM, so drivers will fail because of that right?


Wrong (doing my best Trump speaking into the mic impression).

View attachment 290781


Tryp drivers are NOT MLM sales reps. When you are a Tryp driver and you logon to Tryp’s website, you will see an “upgrade” tab. When you view that tab, you will see them advertising to you to upgrade to what they call an “Influencer”, and how much it costs you to upgrade. An influencer is a sales rep. They receive compensation via commissions, residual income and bonuses for successfully selling the Tryp platform to drivers, none of which a non-Influencer Tryp driver qualifies for. And yes, it is an MLM model, making a Tryp influencer an MLM sales rep.


And everything I’ve said about the MLM model resulting in the market being saturated with sales reps holds 100% true here. The FTC study (linked above) that show that 99% of MLM sales reps fails is applicable here. 99% of Tryp influencers will probably fail (probably fewer than that in the beginning, but over time it will naturally climb that high because saturation in inevitable in the model). Even if Tryp influencers are ten times more successful than other MLM sales reps, that still means 90% will fail. So, unless you really, really, REALLY believe you can succeed, and are willing to take the effort to execute it, then don’t waste your time, money, and effort on upgrading to a Tryp Influencer. It’s just that simple. Just say no…. and just drive for Tryp.


Sometimes you just gotta commit in order to try


My dream would be a rideshare company that uses a subscription-based service fee model without also being an MLM. But I can’t earn a living in my dreams. So, in reality I do what’s best for me. And in reality, the rideshare company offering the best rideshare model for a driver that does 10+ hours per week is Tryp. So, I’m signed up to drive for Tryp, and can’t wait for them to launch in my city. That said, I still have concerns. After a month or two, I could learn to hate their app. It’s possible. I’m not ignoring the possibility of problems when they do finally launch. But Uber and Lyft are so bad at what they are right now that I am willing to give Tryp a try. I am hoping for something better. As the character Andy Dufresne said in the movie The Shawskank Redemption, “Remember Red, hope is a good thing, maybe the best of things, and no good thing ever dies.” To me that means that even if Tryp fails, I will still have hope that something better than Uber and Lyft comes along, and that hope is a good thing.


So, if Tryp needs drivers to commit before they launch, then part of my hope and willingness to try them includes me stepping up to make that commitment. Maybe I am unique in that way. Uber and Lyft have driven me (pun intended) to try many different things due to my hope (Doordash, Postmates, Grubhub, Amazon Flex, Field Agent, Mobee, Gigwalk, Easyshift, Stringr, Roadie, etc, etc..). My hope includes hoping that my market gets enough drivers like me willing to commit to Tryp so they launch, and we can then all get to see what they can do for us.


So that’s how I can state that I hate MLMs, that I am signed up to drive for Try, and not be a hypocrite.


In fact, I’m kind of looking forward to a time when Tryp’s influencers reach the over-saturation point. I’m sure I’ll pull up to a red light and look over to see a 5 hour per week Uber driver parked next to a Tryp influencer standing on the curb who was trying to get the driver to sign up for a model that would never work for them. Then the driver will say, “I wish you were cheaper, ‘cause I can’t seem to get any riders”. To which the influencer will say, “Yeah, I can’t find any new Tryp drivers either”. As the light turns green, I will say to them both, “Yeah, over-saturation sucks, don’t it”, as I pull away to drive to my next Tryp pickup as a Tryp driver. I might even buy a microphone so I can drop it on the road before I pull away.
Too much information.
 

goneubering

Well-Known Member
Yes, Uber & Lyft do it pay as you go. BUT, you pay them AFTER they have proven to you that they can get you some trips. Tryp wants you to pay them BEFORE they've even shown they have any passengers! Stoopid.

If Tryp were legit - and they wanted to do a subscription model - they'd offer dryvers to dryve a month for free. That way dryvers would be able to see that they actually had trips and that they could actually make money.

By the way, I love the Y thing y'all did. That's really innovative and unique - just like Lyft!

And what about Tryp's founder & CEO Robert McNulty? What a scammer! I love the way he portrays himself on his own website - like such a hero. http://www.robertmcnulty.com/

But does he mention there any of the financial frauds and crimes he was penalized for by the SEC years ago? Here's the real McNulty - straight from the pages of the Securities & Exchange Commission (SEC) under whose regulatory guidance, his crimes fell:

In a complaint filed by the Commission on September
30, 1994, McNulty was charged with orchestrating a complex scheme
to defraud investors by using the proceeds of securities
offerings by HQOS, HQOI, Auto Giant and Auto Depot to finance the
operations of affiliated companies and the companies' underwriter
and market maker, Global America, Inc., rather than for the
stated purpose of funding the issuers' operations.

In connection with this scheme, McNulty and the other
defendants caused false and misleading registration statements
and annual and quarterly reports to be filed with the Commission,
caused the companies' books and records to be false, and made
false statements to the companies' auditors with respect to
certain intercompany loans, transfers and advances. McNulty also
failed to file required reports with the Commission concerning
his beneficial ownership of securities issued by Auto Depot. The
Court also ordered McNulty to disgorge ill-gotten gains of
$70,000.00,

LINK HERE.

And in case that is not clear enough, here's a guy who has tracked McNulty's crimes and frauds over the years with a fuller explanation.

So we have an MLM which are ALWAYS scammy and suspect... run by a former con artist. Hmm... yep, I don't see anything to worry about here.
Open question. Is this company active in any city yet?
 

mrpjfresh

Well-Known Member
Open question. Is this company active in any city yet?
No. The app has yet to be unveiled and the playstore links are still "coming soon".

There is a countdown on a Tryp page (not the official one apparently) pointing to the beginning of March, but I'm not holding my breath. The last time I checked, they do not have their TNC license for California yet though apparently they DO have licensing approval in other states such as Ohio. Take that as you will.

It is all still a wait and see at this point.
 

uber-xxx

Well-Known Member
Who in their right @@@@ing mind would pay $200 a month for the “privelage” of doing rideshare, when you can drive on uber and lyft for free AND those companies already have 99% of the existing market. Tryp has also not posted driver rates yet. Drivers can keep 100% of their earnings/fare, but I imagine the per mile and per minute will be BELOW uber/lyft to compensate. Hard pass

Call me when Tryp actually gives rides to customers. THEY DONT EVEN HAVE AN APP!!! THEIR VIDEO/SLIDESHOW PHOTOSHOPS THE UBER/LYFT APPS.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Lissetti

Rebel Honey Badger
Article Manager
Moderator
Mod here. Articles is my section. The Author is a paid Sponsor. You only sign up for Tryp if you actually click "submit." No one is going to unknowingly sign up for Tryp from reading this article. They will make their decisions based on the article and the lengthy discussion thereafter.
 

uber-xxx

Well-Known Member
:rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::o-o::eek:

Mod here. Articles is my section. The Author is a paid Sponsor. You only sign up for Tryp if you actually click "submit." No one is going to unknowingly sign up for Tryp from reading this article. They will make their decisions based on the article and the lengthy discussion thereafter.
Wow
 

UberHammer

Well-Known Member
Past Sponsor
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #72
Who in their right @@@@ing mind would pay $200 a month for the “privelage” of doing rideshare, when you can drive on uber and lyft for free AND those companies already have 99% of the existing market. Tryp has also not posted driver rates yet. Drivers can keep 100% of their earnings/fare, but I imagine the per mile and per minute will be BELOW uber/lyft to compensate. Hard pass

Call me when Tryp actually gives rides to customers. THEY DONT EVEN HAVE AN APP!!! THEIR VIDEO/SLIDESHOW PHOTOSHOPS THE UBER/LYFT APPS.
Tryp rates will be 1 to 2% lower than Uber's rates in every city.

So Tryp drivers will get at 98 to 99% of Uber's rates in their city.

Uber drivers get 75% of Uber's rates in their city (unless they are grandfathered to the old 80%).
 

Actionjax

Well-Known Member
Tryp rates will be 1 to 2% lower than Uber's rates in every city.

So Tryp drivers will get at 98 to 99% of Uber's rates in their city.

Uber drivers get 75% of Uber's rates in their city (unless they are grandfathered to the old 80%).
99% of zero is still zero. You need rides first. They still don't have a strategy for anyone to use them.
 

UberHammer

Well-Known Member
Past Sponsor
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #74
99% of zero is still zero. You need rides first. They still don't have a strategy for anyone to use them.
When you keep ignoring the strategy you can keep saying that.

You may think it will fail, but that's not the same as saying they don't have one.
 

Actionjax

Well-Known Member
When you keep ignoring the strategy you can keep saying that.

You may think it will fail, but that's not the same as saying they don't have one.
From your previous posting.

The booking fee will also only be $1.99, which is $0.50 to $2.00 less than Uber and Lyft, due to them jacking up the booking fee numerous times over the years.

Tryp will also never surge.

Riders also receive reward points for taking rides.
Thats not a strategy. I can tell you we have had 4 other companies try the same thing. Guess where they are today? The only reason they lasted so long with drivers is drivers never had to pay up front for the pleasure of getting a dispatch.

As for reward points again that's provided thats a big deal to a customer. I can tell you points is not since there are ton's of point programs out there.

I can also se them getting sued for the name TRYP. It's already taken by a Spanish hotel chain.

Like I have said before...good luck backing a dud. Somehow I thought you were smarter than this nonsense.
 

Rosalita

Well-Known Member
There's only one question, really, and it's not about the $199 a month. It's this: Does Tryp have passengers? Because if they don't have passengers, then the business structure doesn't matter. The analogy about "one on every corner" is accurate, but it misses the point: Does a new company have passengers?

There will never be a ride share company that considers the drivers as an asset. We're not. It's about their making money off us and getting us to carry the other expenses involved with transporting passengers for a fee. Lyft and Uber carry large debt to maintain their platforms. The assets of Lyft and Uber are its platforms and its passenger lists. It's not their drivers.

Why would Tryp be any different? It has to maintain a platform, doesn't it? It has to advertise, doesn't it? And it has to start from scratch building a passenger base and compete with existing ride share companies. I think there's room for another national company in the U.S. but I'm not convinced that it needs to be "subscription based." It will have to act like it's competitors; i.e., discount ride fares for the first few years to compete and capture market share, build it's passenger base, and carry large debt associated with its platform. Ride share is not about the drivers. I don't see Tryp being any different in that respect. As a matter of fact, it sounds kind of gimmicky.
 

goneubering

Well-Known Member
There's only one question, really, and it's not about the $199 a month. It's this: Does Tryp have passengers? Because if they don't have passengers, then the business structure doesn't matter. The analogy about "one on every corner" is accurate, but it misses the point: Does a new company have passengers?

There will never be a ride share company that considers the drivers as an asset. We're not. It's about their making money off us and getting us to carry the other expenses involved with transporting passengers for a fee. Lyft and Uber carry large debt to maintain their platforms. The assets of Lyft and Uber are its platforms and its passenger lists. It's not their drivers.

Why would Tryp be any different? It has to maintain a platform, doesn't it? It has to advertise, doesn't it? And it has to start from scratch building a passenger base and compete with existing ride share companies. I think there's room for another national company in the U.S. but I'm not convinced that it needs to be "subscription based." It will have to act like it's competitors; i.e., discount ride fares for the first few years to compete and capture market share, build it's passenger base, and carry large debt associated with its platform. Ride share is not about the drivers. I don't see Tryp being any different in that respect. As a matter of fact, it sounds kind of gimmicky.
As far as I know, they don’t even have a functioning app yet. This whole thing is premature speculation.
 

Oscar Levant

Well-Known Member
1) I hate MLMs; 2) I signed up to drive for Tryp; and 3) I am not a hypocrite.

If you are already familiar with the new rideshare company Tryp, then you know they use MLM (Multi-Level Marketing) to recruit drivers to their rideshare platform. So how can I state both #1 and #2 without being a hypocrite?

The reason I hate MLMs is not because they are MLMs. I hate them because of why people who become MLM sales reps fail. In fact, the reason I signed up to drive for Tryp is because Tryp avoids that same why that causes drivers to fail on Uber and Lyft.


Uber and Lyft drivers suffer from the same problem MLM sales reps do.


The biggest reason people who join up to sell for MLMs fail is because the market gets saturated with sales reps for the MLM. If you were the only sales rep in town for the MLM you joined, you’d have a pretty good chance at succeeding as a sales rep for the MLM (assuming it’s a decent product or service). But when your neighbor is also a sales rep for the same MLM, the woman across the street is too, five people on the next block also are, two dozen in the apartment complex around the corner are too, etc, etc…. then it’s close to impossible for any sales rep of the MLM to succeed, except for those at the top that recruited so well that they created the saturation now being experienced by those below them.

In a nutshell, when there’s another one just like you on every street corner, you are highly likely to fail as an MLM sales rep.

Let me say that again, as you can’t miss this point… when there’s another one just like you on every street corner, you are highly likely to fail as an MLM sales rep.

Does that sound familiar? It should. If you are an Uber/Lyft driver this should be hitting home with you, because unless you drive for Uber/Lyft in some remote area, you’ve experienced that exact same issue in the cities Uber and Lyft operates in. And if you haven’t…. just wait. The gig seems great for a while, and then all the sudden you can’t make half of what you were before, because there are drivers online everywhere. This is a big reason why Uber has as high as 96% of their drivers quit within a year of starting to drive (see CNBC.com: https://www.cnbc.com/2017/04/20/only-4-percent-of-uber-drivers-remain-after-a-year-says-report.html).


99% fail… 96% quit… Tomato…. ToMAHto….


Similarly speaking, FTC studies have shown that as many as 99% of people who join MLMs as sales reps fail (see FTC.gov: https://www.ftc.gov/sites/default/files/documents/public_comments/trade-regulation-rule-disclosure-requirements-and-prohibitions-concerning-business-opportunities-ftc.r511993-00010 /00010-57283.pdf). So…. MLM sales rep…. Uber driver…. one on every street corner…. 99% fail…. 96% quit…. Are you seeing the comparison here?

Forget that a driver is a completely different job than being a sales rep. Because It’s not the type of job that matters. Also forget that Uber and Lyft are not MLMs. Because it’s not the type of company that matters. It’s the over-saturated market conditions that matter.

If it looks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it probably is a duck. Being a sales rep in an over-saturated market is a duck. Being an Uber/Lyft driver in an over-saturated market is a duck. They are both ducks, because over-saturation sucks. The model MLMs use naturally results in over-saturation of their sales reps, and the model Uber and Lyft use naturally result in over-saturation of their drivers. So, the reason I hate MLMs is the exact same reason I hate Uber and Lyft. Their business models both naturally result in over-saturation.


Doesn’t that make Tryp twice as bad?


So now, you might be thinking, wouldn’t that make Tryp twice as bad? Isn’t it just combining the Uber model with an MLM model?

For the driver, the answer is clearly no, for two reasons: 1) Tryp’s subscription-based service fee model avoids the problem that both Uber and Lyft’s models suffer from that results in the over-saturation of drivers on their platforms; and 2) Tryp drivers don’t have to be MLM sales reps… Tryp drivers can just be drivers.


How does Tryp avoid driver over-saturation?


Drivers have been asking Uber and Lyft for years to either put a limit on the number of drivers that can sign up, or a limit on the number of drivers that can be online at the same time. Such limits would be very similar to what cities have done for decades, where they limit the number of taxi licenses, sometimes called medallions. In New York city, one taxi medallion was worth nearly $1 million to the person that owned it. This is because limits create scarcity, which results in value. It’s a simple economic principle. Government created these limits because without them so many taxis became available, it reduced the value of their services so much that the taxi drivers couldn’t make a living (a situation very similar to why 96% of drivers Uber drivers quit within a year).


What the drivers are asking Uber and Lyft to do would also be like limitations some other driving gig apps have, like Doordash, where a Doordash delivery driver can’t logon to be available to accept deliveries unless the app is allowing more drivers to logon in an area.


However, Uber and Lyft benefit from the over-saturation of drivers on their platforms. When it’s occurring, riders get matched to a driver closer and quicker than they would if the market was not over-saturated with drivers, which reduces the chances of the potential rider using the other platform to get a ride. So, Uber and Lyft have absolutely zero reason to do anything about this. They would never add a feature to their platform that creates such a limit unless some serious market condition, or government regulation forced them to.


Tryp on the other hand doesn’t even need to add such a feature. The subscription-based service fee model Tryp uses naturally results in limitation. According to Uber, around half of Uber drivers drive for Uber for less than 10 hours per week (see Fastcompany.com: https://www.fastcompany.com/90240917/driving-for-uber-and-lyft-full-time-is-getting-harder). That means that around half of Uber drivers would not sign up to drive for Tryp, because they don’t drive enough to benefit from Tryp’s once a month $199 service fee subscription model. The full time Uber drivers who are having $1000+ in service fees taken from their fares will love only having to only pay $199 in service fees instead of $1000+. But for most drivers who drive less than 10 hours per week, the $199 monthly Tryp service fee would cost them more than the total service fees Uber is currently taking from their fares every month. Thus, they won’t drive for Tryp.


A subscription fee is a barrier to entry… a limitation.


That is what is called a “barrier to entry”. The barrier limits the number of people who enter. Tryp doesn’t have to create a feature on the platform to limit the number of drivers, because their $199 barrier to entry does that naturally. So, if all existing rideshare riders are potential Tryp riders, but only half of existing rideshare drivers are potential Tryp drivers, Tryp is naturally going to have a healthier rider to driver ratio on their platform compared to Uber and Lyft, as Tryp establishes its presence in the rideshare market.


In fact, to the driver it doesn’t even matter what share of the rideshare market Tryp gets. In other words, the question “will Tryp get enough riders”, while being important to the owners of Tryp, is somewhat meaningless to the drivers. Uber could get a million ride requests in day, but if there are a million drivers online that day, every Uber driver is going to average 1 ride a day. That’s what over-saturation does. To the drivers, it’s not the volume of riders a platform gets. It’s the ratio of riders to drivers on the platform that matters. A healthier ratio is less saturated with drivers, which results in more ride requests getting assigned to drivers on the platform.


If Tryp gets as little as 2% of riders and 1% of drivers in the rideshare market to switch, Tryp drivers benefit from a rider to driver ratio that’s twice as healthy as they what they experience on Uber and Lyft. And if Tryp gets as much as 30% of riders and 15% of drivers to switch Tryp drivers still have a rider to driver ratio that’s twice as healthy. So regardless of what share of the rideshare market Tryp gets, Tryp drivers get the same ratio benefit. So, drivers in the first month of Tryp’s existence can expect the same ratio benefit produced by the $199/month barrier to entry as Tryp drivers in the 10th year of Tryp’s existence, despite how much smaller Tryp would be in their 1st month than they would be in year 10.


It's the subscription model, not the company, that is great.


I’ve said I hate a few things so far. I said I hate MLMs. I said I hate Uber and Lyft. I said I hate over-saturation, and the reasons that lead to over-saturation. All that hate leads me to love a subscription based rideshare model. That doesn’t mean I love Tryp. That means I love the subscription-based model they’re using. If some other new rideshare company started with this same subscription-based model, I’d love it too. It’s the model, not the company that uses it, that makes it great.


Why being an MLM has no impact on drivers.


But Tryp is still an MLM, so drivers will fail because of that right?


Wrong (doing my best Trump speaking into the mic impression).

View attachment 290781


Tryp drivers are NOT MLM sales reps. When you are a Tryp driver and you logon to Tryp’s website, you will see an “upgrade” tab. When you view that tab, you will see them advertising to you to upgrade to what they call an “Influencer”, and how much it costs you to upgrade. An influencer is a sales rep. They receive compensation via commissions, residual income and bonuses for successfully selling the Tryp platform to drivers, none of which a non-Influencer Tryp driver qualifies for. And yes, it is an MLM model, making a Tryp influencer an MLM sales rep.


And everything I’ve said about the MLM model resulting in the market being saturated with sales reps holds 100% true here. The FTC study (linked above) that show that 99% of MLM sales reps fails is applicable here. 99% of Tryp influencers will probably fail (probably fewer than that in the beginning, but over time it will naturally climb that high because saturation in inevitable in the model). Even if Tryp influencers are ten times more successful than other MLM sales reps, that still means 90% will fail. So, unless you really, really, REALLY believe you can succeed, and are willing to take the effort to execute it, then don’t waste your time, money, and effort on upgrading to a Tryp Influencer. It’s just that simple. Just say no…. and just drive for Tryp.


Sometimes you just gotta commit in order to try


My dream would be a rideshare company that uses a subscription-based service fee model without also being an MLM. But I can’t earn a living in my dreams. So, in reality I do what’s best for me. And in reality, the rideshare company offering the best rideshare model for a driver that does 10+ hours per week is Tryp. So, I’m signed up to drive for Tryp, and can’t wait for them to launch in my city. That said, I still have concerns. After a month or two, I could learn to hate their app. It’s possible. I’m not ignoring the possibility of problems when they do finally launch. But Uber and Lyft are so bad at what they are right now that I am willing to give Tryp a try. I am hoping for something better. As the character Andy Dufresne said in the movie The Shawskank Redemption, “Remember Red, hope is a good thing, maybe the best of things, and no good thing ever dies.” To me that means that even if Tryp fails, I will still have hope that something better than Uber and Lyft comes along, and that hope is a good thing.


So, if Tryp needs drivers to commit before they launch, then part of my hope and willingness to try them includes me stepping up to make that commitment. Maybe I am unique in that way. Uber and Lyft have driven me (pun intended) to try many different things due to my hope (Doordash, Postmates, Grubhub, Amazon Flex, Field Agent, Mobee, Gigwalk, Easyshift, Stringr, Roadie, etc, etc..). My hope includes hoping that my market gets enough drivers like me willing to commit to Tryp so they launch, and we can then all get to see what they can do for us.


So that’s how I can state that I hate MLMs, that I am signed up to drive for Try, and not be a hypocrite.


In fact, I’m kind of looking forward to a time when Tryp’s influencers reach the over-saturation point. I’m sure I’ll pull up to a red light and look over to see a 5 hour per week Uber driver parked next to a Tryp influencer standing on the curb who was trying to get the driver to sign up for a model that would never work for them. Then the driver will say, “I wish you were cheaper, ‘cause I can’t seem to get any riders”. To which the influencer will say, “Yeah, I can’t find any new Tryp drivers either”. As the light turns green, I will say to them both, “Yeah, over-saturation sucks, don’t it”, as I pull away to drive to my next Tryp pickup as a Tryp driver. I might even buy a microphone so I can drop it on the road before I pull away.


I've always told people, when the subject comes up about Uber ( and it does a lot, given that I'm driving an Uber ) I tell people that if i were the CEO, I'd go the taxi route, charge a radio service fee ( calling it something else, of course ). For uber, it would be worth more than $200 per month due to the volume of calls, In my view, the price of radio service shouldn't exceed a shift and one half to make the nut, and the rest you keep so if youi work six days 10 hour shifts, you'll do very well ( but many cab companies are much greedier ). Yellow in San Diego charges $180 week ( and we get the lion's share of business, but they have city cab stand priviledges and hail priviledges ).
 

KD_LA

Well-Known Member
Author
To say you don't like Tryp's model is like saying you don't like Old Country Buffet because they make you pay $15 BEFORE you start eating. And that you prefer to go to Applebees because they don't make you pay until AFTER you're done.... but yet you pay Applebees $25... and ate less food.
If I go to the aforementioned Old Country Buffet, and give them my $15, just past the cash register is the food. Where's the food of this MLM scheme?
 
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