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1) I hate MLMs; 2) I signed up to drive for Tryp; and 3) I am not a hypocrite.

1) I hate MLMs; 2) I signed up to drive for Tryp; and 3) I am not a hypocrite.

If you are already familiar with the new rideshare company Tryp, then you know they use MLM (Multi-Level Marketing) to recruit drivers to their rideshare platform. So how can I state both #1 and #2 without being a hypocrite?

The reason I hate MLMs is not because they are MLMs. I hate them because of why people who become MLM sales reps fail. In fact, the reason I signed up to drive for Tryp is because Tryp avoids that same why that causes drivers to fail on Uber and Lyft.


Uber and Lyft drivers suffer from the same problem MLM sales reps do.


The biggest reason people who join up to sell for MLMs fail is because the market gets saturated with sales reps for the MLM. If you were the only sales rep in town for the MLM you joined, you’d have a pretty good chance at succeeding as a sales rep for the MLM (assuming it’s a decent product or service). But when your neighbor is also a sales rep for the same MLM, the woman across the street is too, five people on the next block also are, two dozen in the apartment complex around the corner are too, etc, etc…. then it’s close to impossible for any sales rep of the MLM to succeed, except for those at the top that recruited so well that they created the saturation now being experienced by those below them.

In a nutshell, when there’s another one just like you on every street corner, you are highly likely to fail as an MLM sales rep.

Let me say that again, as you can’t miss this point… when there’s another one just like you on every street corner, you are highly likely to fail as an MLM sales rep.

Does that sound familiar? It should. If you are an Uber/Lyft driver this should be hitting home with you, because unless you drive for Uber/Lyft in some remote area, you’ve experienced that exact same issue in the cities Uber and Lyft operates in. And if you haven’t…. just wait. The gig seems great for a while, and then all the sudden you can’t make half of what you were before, because there are drivers online everywhere. This is a big reason why Uber has as high as 96% of their drivers quit within a year of starting to drive (see CNBC.com: https://www.cnbc.com/2017/04/20/only-4-percent-of-uber-drivers-remain-after-a-year-says-report.html).


99% fail… 96% quit… Tomato…. ToMAHto….


Similarly speaking, FTC studies have shown that as many as 99% of people who join MLMs as sales reps fail (see FTC.gov: https://www.ftc.gov/sites/default/files/documents/public_comments/trade-regulation-rule-disclosure-requirements-and-prohibitions-concerning-business-opportunities-ftc.r511993-00010 /00010-57283.pdf). So…. MLM sales rep…. Uber driver…. one on every street corner…. 99% fail…. 96% quit…. Are you seeing the comparison here?

Forget that a driver is a completely different job than being a sales rep. Because It’s not the type of job that matters. Also forget that Uber and Lyft are not MLMs. Because it’s not the type of company that matters. It’s the over-saturated market conditions that matter.

If it looks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it probably is a duck. Being a sales rep in an over-saturated market is a duck. Being an Uber/Lyft driver in an over-saturated market is a duck. They are both ducks, because over-saturation sucks. The model MLMs use naturally results in over-saturation of their sales reps, and the model Uber and Lyft use naturally result in over-saturation of their drivers. So, the reason I hate MLMs is the exact same reason I hate Uber and Lyft. Their business models both naturally result in over-saturation.


Doesn’t that make Tryp twice as bad?


So now, you might be thinking, wouldn’t that make Tryp twice as bad? Isn’t it just combining the Uber model with an MLM model?

For the driver, the answer is clearly no, for two reasons: 1) Tryp’s subscription-based service fee model avoids the problem that both Uber and Lyft’s models suffer from that results in the over-saturation of drivers on their platforms; and 2) Tryp drivers don’t have to be MLM sales reps… Tryp drivers can just be drivers.


How does Tryp avoid driver over-saturation?


Drivers have been asking Uber and Lyft for years to either put a limit on the number of drivers that can sign up, or a limit on the number of drivers that can be online at the same time. Such limits would be very similar to what cities have done for decades, where they limit the number of taxi licenses, sometimes called medallions. In New York city, one taxi medallion was worth nearly $1 million to the person that owned it. This is because limits create scarcity, which results in value. It’s a simple economic principle. Government created these limits because without them so many taxis became available, it reduced the value of their services so much that the taxi drivers couldn’t make a living (a situation very similar to why 96% of drivers Uber drivers quit within a year).


What the drivers are asking Uber and Lyft to do would also be like limitations some other driving gig apps have, like Doordash, where a Doordash delivery driver can’t logon to be available to accept deliveries unless the app is allowing more drivers to logon in an area.


However, Uber and Lyft benefit from the over-saturation of drivers on their platforms. When it’s occurring, riders get matched to a driver closer and quicker than they would if the market was not over-saturated with drivers, which reduces the chances of the potential rider using the other platform to get a ride. So, Uber and Lyft have absolutely zero reason to do anything about this. They would never add a feature to their platform that creates such a limit unless some serious market condition, or government regulation forced them to.


Tryp on the other hand doesn’t even need to add such a feature. The subscription-based service fee model Tryp uses naturally results in limitation. According to Uber, around half of Uber drivers drive for Uber for less than 10 hours per week (see Fastcompany.com: https://www.fastcompany.com/90240917/driving-for-uber-and-lyft-full-time-is-getting-harder). That means that around half of Uber drivers would not sign up to drive for Tryp, because they don’t drive enough to benefit from Tryp’s once a month $199 service fee subscription model. The full time Uber drivers who are having $1000+ in service fees taken from their fares will love only having to only pay $199 in service fees instead of $1000+. But for most drivers who drive less than 10 hours per week, the $199 monthly Tryp service fee would cost them more than the total service fees Uber is currently taking from their fares every month. Thus, they won’t drive for Tryp.


A subscription fee is a barrier to entry… a limitation.


That is what is called a “barrier to entry”. The barrier limits the number of people who enter. Tryp doesn’t have to create a feature on the platform to limit the number of drivers, because their $199 barrier to entry does that naturally. So, if all existing rideshare riders are potential Tryp riders, but only half of existing rideshare drivers are potential Tryp drivers, Tryp is naturally going to have a healthier rider to driver ratio on their platform compared to Uber and Lyft, as Tryp establishes its presence in the rideshare market.


In fact, to the driver it doesn’t even matter what share of the rideshare market Tryp gets. In other words, the question “will Tryp get enough riders”, while being important to the owners of Tryp, is somewhat meaningless to the drivers. Uber could get a million ride requests in day, but if there are a million drivers online that day, every Uber driver is going to average 1 ride a day. That’s what over-saturation does. To the drivers, it’s not the volume of riders a platform gets. It’s the ratio of riders to drivers on the platform that matters. A healthier ratio is less saturated with drivers, which results in more ride requests getting assigned to drivers on the platform.


If Tryp gets as little as 2% of riders and 1% of drivers in the rideshare market to switch, Tryp drivers benefit from a rider to driver ratio that’s twice as healthy as they what they experience on Uber and Lyft. And if Tryp gets as much as 30% of riders and 15% of drivers to switch Tryp drivers still have a rider to driver ratio that’s twice as healthy. So regardless of what share of the rideshare market Tryp gets, Tryp drivers get the same ratio benefit. So, drivers in the first month of Tryp’s existence can expect the same ratio benefit produced by the $199/month barrier to entry as Tryp drivers in the 10th year of Tryp’s existence, despite how much smaller Tryp would be in their 1st month than they would be in year 10.


It's the subscription model, not the company, that is great.


I’ve said I hate a few things so far. I said I hate MLMs. I said I hate Uber and Lyft. I said I hate over-saturation, and the reasons that lead to over-saturation. All that hate leads me to love a subscription based rideshare model. That doesn’t mean I love Tryp. That means I love the subscription-based model they’re using. If some other new rideshare company started with this same subscription-based model, I’d love it too. It’s the model, not the company that uses it, that makes it great.


Why being an MLM has no impact on drivers.


But Tryp is still an MLM, so drivers will fail because of that right?


Wrong (doing my best Trump speaking into the mic impression).

trump2.gif



Tryp drivers are NOT MLM sales reps. When you are a Tryp driver and you logon to Tryp’s website, you will see an “upgrade” tab. When you view that tab, you will see them advertising to you to upgrade to what they call an “Influencer”, and how much it costs you to upgrade. An influencer is a sales rep. They receive compensation via commissions, residual income and bonuses for successfully selling the Tryp platform to drivers, none of which a non-Influencer Tryp driver qualifies for. And yes, it is an MLM model, making a Tryp influencer an MLM sales rep.


And everything I’ve said about the MLM model resulting in the market being saturated with sales reps holds 100% true here. The FTC study (linked above) that show that 99% of MLM sales reps fails is applicable here. 99% of Tryp influencers will probably fail (probably fewer than that in the beginning, but over time it will naturally climb that high because saturation in inevitable in the model). Even if Tryp influencers are ten times more successful than other MLM sales reps, that still means 90% will fail. So, unless you really, really, REALLY believe you can succeed, and are willing to take the effort to execute it, then don’t waste your time, money, and effort on upgrading to a Tryp Influencer. It’s just that simple. Just say no…. and just drive for Tryp.


Sometimes you just gotta commit in order to try


My dream would be a rideshare company that uses a subscription-based service fee model without also being an MLM. But I can’t earn a living in my dreams. So, in reality I do what’s best for me. And in reality, the rideshare company offering the best rideshare model for a driver that does 10+ hours per week is Tryp. So, I’m signed up to drive for Tryp, and can’t wait for them to launch in my city. That said, I still have concerns. After a month or two, I could learn to hate their app. It’s possible. I’m not ignoring the possibility of problems when they do finally launch. But Uber and Lyft are so bad at what they are right now that I am willing to give Tryp a try. I am hoping for something better. As the character Andy Dufresne said in the movie The Shawskank Redemption, “Remember Red, hope is a good thing, maybe the best of things, and no good thing ever dies.” To me that means that even if Tryp fails, I will still have hope that something better than Uber and Lyft comes along, and that hope is a good thing.


So, if Tryp needs drivers to commit before they launch, then part of my hope and willingness to try them includes me stepping up to make that commitment. Maybe I am unique in that way. Uber and Lyft have driven me (pun intended) to try many different things due to my hope (Doordash, Postmates, Grubhub, Amazon Flex, Field Agent, Mobee, Gigwalk, Easyshift, Stringr, Roadie, etc, etc..). My hope includes hoping that my market gets enough drivers like me willing to commit to Tryp so they launch, and we can then all get to see what they can do for us.


So that’s how I can state that I hate MLMs, that I am signed up to drive for Try, and not be a hypocrite.


In fact, I’m kind of looking forward to a time when Tryp’s influencers reach the over-saturation point. I’m sure I’ll pull up to a red light and look over to see a 5 hour per week Uber driver parked next to a Tryp influencer standing on the curb who was trying to get the driver to sign up for a model that would never work for them. Then the driver will say, “I wish you were cheaper, ‘cause I can’t seem to get any riders”. To which the influencer will say, “Yeah, I can’t find any new Tryp drivers either”. As the light turns green, I will say to them both, “Yeah, over-saturation sucks, don’t it”, as I pull away to drive to my next Tryp pickup as a Tryp driver. I might even buy a microphone so I can drop it on the road before I pull away.
 
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Comments

180dayofchange

Active Member
So here is the next level, that we should pay for using our car to give rides to passengers...Thanks but no thanks...


1) I hate MLMs; 2) I signed up to drive for Tryp; and 3) I am not a hypocrite.

If you are already familiar with the new rideshare company Tryp, then you know they use MLM (Multi-Level Marketing) to recruit drivers to their rideshare platform. So how can I state both #1 and #2 without being a hypocrite?

The reason I hate MLMs is not because they are MLMs. I hate them because of why people who become MLM sales reps fail. In fact, the reason I signed up to drive for Tryp is because Tryp avoids that same why that causes drivers to fail on Uber and Lyft.


Uber and Lyft drivers suffer from the same problem MLM sales reps do.


The biggest reason people who join up to sell for MLMs fail is because the market gets saturated with sales reps for the MLM. If you were the only sales rep in town for the MLM you joined, you’d have a pretty good chance at succeeding as a sales rep for the MLM (assuming it’s a decent product or service). But when your neighbor is also a sales rep for the same MLM, the woman across the street is too, five people on the next block also are, two dozen in the apartment complex around the corner are too, etc, etc…. then it’s close to impossible for any sales rep of the MLM to succeed, except for those at the top that recruited so well that they created the saturation now being experienced by those below them.

In a nutshell, when there’s another one just like you on every street corner, you are highly likely to fail as an MLM sales rep.

Let me say that again, as you can’t miss this point… when there’s another one just like you on every street corner, you are highly likely to fail as an MLM sales rep.

Does that sound familiar? It should. If you are an Uber/Lyft driver this should be hitting home with you, because unless you drive for Uber/Lyft in some remote area, you’ve experienced that exact same issue in the cities Uber and Lyft operates in. And if you haven’t…. just wait. The gig seems great for a while, and then all the sudden you can’t make half of what you were before, because there are drivers online everywhere. This is a big reason why Uber has as high as 96% of their drivers quit within a year of starting to drive (see CNBC.com: https://www.cnbc.com/2017/04/20/only-4-percent-of-uber-drivers-remain-after-a-year-says-report.html).


99% fail… 96% quit… Tomato…. ToMAHto….


Similarly speaking, FTC studies have shown that as many as 99% of people who join MLMs as sales reps fail (see FTC.gov: https://www.ftc.gov/sites/default/files/documents/public_comments/trade-regulation-rule-disclosure-requirements-and-prohibitions-concerning-business-opportunities-ftc.r511993-00010 /00010-57283.pdf). So…. MLM sales rep…. Uber driver…. one on every street corner…. 99% fail…. 96% quit…. Are you seeing the comparison here?

Forget that a driver is a completely different job than being a sales rep. Because It’s not the type of job that matters. Also forget that Uber and Lyft are not MLMs. Because it’s not the type of company that matters. It’s the over-saturated market conditions that matter.

If it looks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it probably is a duck. Being a sales rep in an over-saturated market is a duck. Being an Uber/Lyft driver in an over-saturated market is a duck. They are both ducks, because over-saturation sucks. The model MLMs use naturally results in over-saturation of their sales reps, and the model Uber and Lyft use naturally result in over-saturation of their drivers. So, the reason I hate MLMs is the exact same reason I hate Uber and Lyft. Their business models both naturally result in over-saturation.


Doesn’t that make Tryp twice as bad?


So now, you might be thinking, wouldn’t that make Tryp twice as bad? Isn’t it just combining the Uber model with an MLM model?

For the driver, the answer is clearly no, for two reasons: 1) Tryp’s subscription-based service fee model avoids the problem that both Uber and Lyft’s models suffer from that results in the over-saturation of drivers on their platforms; and 2) Tryp drivers don’t have to be MLM sales reps… Tryp drivers can just be drivers.


How does Tryp avoid driver over-saturation?


Drivers have been asking Uber and Lyft for years to either put a limit on the number of drivers that can sign up, or a limit on the number of drivers that can be online at the same time. Such limits would be very similar to what cities have done for decades, where they limit the number of taxi licenses, sometimes called medallions. In New York city, one taxi medallion was worth nearly $1 million to the person that owned it. This is because limits create scarcity, which results in value. It’s a simple economic principle. Government created these limits because without them so many taxis became available, it reduced the value of their services so much that the taxi drivers couldn’t make a living (a situation very similar to why 96% of drivers Uber drivers quit within a year).


What the drivers are asking Uber and Lyft to do would also be like limitations some other driving gig apps have, like Doordash, where a Doordash delivery driver can’t logon to be available to accept deliveries unless the app is allowing more drivers to logon in an area.


However, Uber and Lyft benefit from the over-saturation of drivers on their platforms. When it’s occurring, riders get matched to a driver closer and quicker than they would if the market was not over-saturated with drivers, which reduces the chances of the potential rider using the other platform to get a ride. So, Uber and Lyft have absolutely zero reason to do anything about this. They would never add a feature to their platform that creates such a limit unless some serious market condition, or government regulation forced them to.


Tryp on the other hand doesn’t even need to add such a feature. The subscription-based service fee model Tryp uses naturally results in limitation. According to Uber, around half of Uber drivers drive for Uber for less than 10 hours per week (see Fastcompany.com: https://www.fastcompany.com/90240917/driving-for-uber-and-lyft-full-time-is-getting-harder). That means that around half of Uber drivers would not sign up to drive for Tryp, because they don’t drive enough to benefit from Tryp’s once a month $199 service fee subscription model. The full time Uber drivers who are having $1000+ in service fees taken from their fares will love only having to only pay $199 in service fees instead of $1000+. But for most drivers who drive less than 10 hours per week, the $199 monthly Tryp service fee would cost them more than the total service fees Uber is currently taking from their fares every month. Thus, they won’t drive for Tryp.


A subscription fee is a barrier to entry… a limitation.


That is what is called a “barrier to entry”. The barrier limits the number of people who enter. Tryp doesn’t have to create a feature on the platform to limit the number of drivers, because their $199 barrier to entry does that naturally. So, if all existing rideshare riders are potential Tryp riders, but only half of existing rideshare drivers are potential Tryp drivers, Tryp is naturally going to have a healthier rider to driver ratio on their platform compared to Uber and Lyft, as Tryp establishes its presence in the rideshare market.


In fact, to the driver it doesn’t even matter what share of the rideshare market Tryp gets. In other words, the question “will Tryp get enough riders”, while being important to the owners of Tryp, is somewhat meaningless to the drivers. Uber could get a million ride requests in day, but if there are a million drivers online that day, every Uber driver is going to average 1 ride a day. That’s what over-saturation does. To the drivers, it’s not the volume of riders a platform gets. It’s the ratio of riders to drivers on the platform that matters. A healthier ratio is less saturated with drivers, which results in more ride requests getting assigned to drivers on the platform.


If Tryp gets as little as 2% of riders and 1% of drivers in the rideshare market to switch, Tryp drivers benefit from a rider to driver ratio that’s twice as healthy as they what they experience on Uber and Lyft. And if Tryp gets as much as 30% of riders and 15% of drivers to switch Tryp drivers still have a rider to driver ratio that’s twice as healthy. So regardless of what share of the rideshare market Tryp gets, Tryp drivers get the same ratio benefit. So, drivers in the first month of Tryp’s existence can expect the same ratio benefit produced by the $199/month barrier to entry as Tryp drivers in the 10th year of Tryp’s existence, despite how much smaller Tryp would be in their 1st month than they would be in year 10.


It's the subscription model, not the company, that is great.


I’ve said I hate a few things so far. I said I hate MLMs. I said I hate Uber and Lyft. I said I hate over-saturation, and the reasons that lead to over-saturation. All that hate leads me to love a subscription based rideshare model. That doesn’t mean I love Tryp. That means I love the subscription-based model they’re using. If some other new rideshare company started with this same subscription-based model, I’d love it too. It’s the model, not the company that uses it, that makes it great.


Why being an MLM has no impact on drivers.


But Tryp is still an MLM, so drivers will fail because of that right?


Wrong (doing my best Trump speaking into the mic impression).

View attachment 290781


Tryp drivers are NOT MLM sales reps. When you are a Tryp driver and you logon to Tryp’s website, you will see an “upgrade” tab. When you view that tab, you will see them advertising to you to upgrade to what they call an “Influencer”, and how much it costs you to upgrade. An influencer is a sales rep. They receive compensation via commissions, residual income and bonuses for successfully selling the Tryp platform to drivers, none of which a non-Influencer Tryp driver qualifies for. And yes, it is an MLM model, making a Tryp influencer an MLM sales rep.


And everything I’ve said about the MLM model resulting in the market being saturated with sales reps holds 100% true here. The FTC study (linked above) that show that 99% of MLM sales reps fails is applicable here. 99% of Tryp influencers will probably fail (probably fewer than that in the beginning, but over time it will naturally climb that high because saturation in inevitable in the model). Even if Tryp influencers are ten times more successful than other MLM sales reps, that still means 90% will fail. So, unless you really, really, REALLY believe you can succeed, and are willing to take the effort to execute it, then don’t waste your time, money, and effort on upgrading to a Tryp Influencer. It’s just that simple. Just say no…. and just drive for Tryp.


Sometimes you just gotta commit in order to try


My dream would be a rideshare company that uses a subscription-based service fee model without also being an MLM. But I can’t earn a living in my dreams. So, in reality I do what’s best for me. And in reality, the rideshare company offering the best rideshare model for a driver that does 10+ hours per week is Tryp. So, I’m signed up to drive for Tryp, and can’t wait for them to launch in my city. That said, I still have concerns. After a month or two, I could learn to hate their app. It’s possible. I’m not ignoring the possibility of problems when they do finally launch. But Uber and Lyft are so bad at what they are right now that I am willing to give Tryp a try. I am hoping for something better. As the character Andy Dufresne said in the movie The Shawskank Redemption, “Remember Red, hope is a good thing, maybe the best of things, and no good thing ever dies.” To me that means that even if Tryp fails, I will still have hope that something better than Uber and Lyft comes along, and that hope is a good thing.


So, if Tryp needs drivers to commit before they launch, then part of my hope and willingness to try them includes me stepping up to make that commitment. Maybe I am unique in that way. Uber and Lyft have driven me (pun intended) to try many different things due to my hope (Doordash, Postmates, Grubhub, Amazon Flex, Field Agent, Mobee, Gigwalk, Easyshift, Stringr, Roadie, etc, etc..). My hope includes hoping that my market gets enough drivers like me willing to commit to Tryp so they launch, and we can then all get to see what they can do for us.


So that’s how I can state that I hate MLMs, that I am signed up to drive for Try, and not be a hypocrite.


In fact, I’m kind of looking forward to a time when Tryp’s influencers reach the over-saturation point. I’m sure I’ll pull up to a red light and look over to see a 5 hour per week Uber driver parked next to a Tryp influencer standing on the curb who was trying to get the driver to sign up for a model that would never work for them. Then the driver will say, “I wish you were cheaper, ‘cause I can’t seem to get any riders”. To which the influencer will say, “Yeah, I can’t find any new Tryp drivers either”. As the light turns green, I will say to them both, “Yeah, over-saturation sucks, don’t it”, as I pull away to drive to my next Tryp pickup as a Tryp driver. I might even buy a microphone so I can drop it on the road before I pull away.


To sign up for your free Tryp account and learn more about becoming a Tryp driver, visit https://tryprides.net/?re=tryprober8746 and use the referral code "tryprober8746".

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The Gift of Fish

Well-Known Member
No it doesn't.

That is some Tryp Influencer's personal site, that is in violation of their agreement with Tryp because they use the Tryp name in the domain. They will be deactivated from Tryp soon.... if they already haven't been.
Ok; that site is extremely unprofessional-looking. It's also full of spelling and grammar errors and looks nasty. But the next point is, where is Tryp's website? I can't see any web presence from them.
Tryp's rates will be 1 to 2% lower than the Uber rates in each city.
I don't think 1 or 2 per cent will be enough to make people switch. At 1% off, my $7 Uber ride would be $6.93 on Tryp. Not enough.

In order to wrest pax away from UberLyft, Tryp would need to make a compelling case as to why they should switch. A unique selling point. But I don't see one.

Maybe they could try the "ethical" angle. This is Lyft's approach, and they have managed to maintain the facade that they are an ethical alternative to Uber. However, even the worst offences committed by Travis and his team (mistreating female employees, whoring in Korea, banging donkeys in the service elevator etc etc) was not enough - Uber is still very much number one and Lyft is still the underdog.

No.... Tryp is going to have to come up with some way to differentiate its service in a way that will make pax actually want to switch.

I don't see a way of competing effectively with Uber that would work long-term.
1) Uber and Lyft are spending a ton of money in autonomous vehicle research (self driving cars). Both of them have the goal of eventually not having drivers in rides on their service. They are both spending billions to make that happen as as soon as possible, and their riders and drivers are financing that by paying high amounts in booking fees, rates, and service fees.

Tryp has no intention of doing such research, and as such does not have those costs on their books. There are no research costs that Tryp needs to pass on to the riders and drivers.
This is mentioned a lot. However, if we look at how US GAAP accounting principles work, not all research and development costs end up on the profit and loss statement. Investments in vehicles, test facilities, software, patents etc etc do not get expensed; instead they get capitalised and end up on the balance sheet. This is generally any property that is not for resale and has an expected life of greater than 12 months. The only R&D activity that ends up on the profit and loss, and in this case contributes to Uber's losses, is expensable items such as programmer's salaries, heat & light for development facilities etc. Just to illustrate some numbers, if all of the $5 billion loss was due to AI programmers' salaries, for example, and programmers earn $150,000 per year, that would be enough to employ 33,333 programmers on their AI project. However, Uber only has 12,000 employees, of all types, in its entire company. None of us know exactly what Uber's R&D expense is, but just by sense-checking the numbers and how investments are financially accounted for, it's clear that there's a lot more behind Uber's losses than that.
2) Over the years Uber and Lyft spent a ton of money in legal fees due to existing laws that got them in trouble, as well as spent a ton of money on lobbyists to get those laws changed in nearly every state in the US.
The most high-profile settlement that Uber has reached that I know of is the $100m one agreed in California. However, $100m is just 2% of one year's losses of $5bn. It's a drop in the bucket.
3) The rideshare market has grown to what it is because not only did Uber and Lyft market to promote their brands, but they convinced a lot of people to change their lifestyle, resulting in those people needing rideshare more. This was not easy, nor cheap. It took a lot of subsidized rides (free to the rider, but driver still got paid), but now today people even decide where to live based on the availability of rideshare.

Tryp has no need to invest in creating a rideshare market like Uber and Lyft did. It already exists (thanks to them). Tryp simply needs to advertise to that existing rideshare market. There is no debt and interest costs for the expenses of creating a rideshare market that Tryp needs to pass on to the riders and drivers.
It is true that the rideshare market cost UberLyft billions to create and that the industry is now mature. Everyone now knows what Uber and Lyft are. However, if what you say was true; that now the market is more mature there is less cost involved for the providers, then we would be seeing now that Uber's costs would be declining, and losses narrowing or even turning into profit. However, in reality, Uber's costs keep increasing, and each year their losses continue to go higher and higher.

If I were Uber, I would not be worried about Tryp. Uber is already taking pre-emptive measures against new entrants in the industry by introducing its new customer loyalty program. "Rewards", I think they're calling it. Whenever a new entrant comes onto the scene, Uber will just ramp up the sweetners to its pax in the affected markets.

Hopefully a new entrant will appear which does have the ability to take on Uber/Lyft, but I have not seen one yet.
 

UberHammer

Well-Known Member
Past Sponsor
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #43
Ok; that site is extremely unprofessional-looking. It's also full of spelling and grammar errors and looks nasty. But the next point is, where is Tryp's website? I can't see any web presence from them.
http://www.TrypRides.com

I don't think 1 or 2 per cent will be enough to make people switch. At 1% off, my $7 Uber ride would be $6.93 on Tryp. Not enough.

In order to wrest pax away from UberLyft, Tryp would need to make a compelling case as to why they should switch. A unique selling point. But I don't see one.
The booking fee will also only be $1.99, which is $0.50 to $2.00 less than Uber and Lyft, due to them jacking up the booking fee numerous times over the years.

Tryp will also never surge.

Riders also receive reward points for taking rides.

Maybe they could try the "ethical" angle. This is Lyft's approach, and they have managed to maintain the facade that they are an ethical alternative to Uber. However, even the worst offences committed by Travis and his team (mistreating female employees, whoring in Korea, banging donkeys in the service elevator etc etc) was not enough - Uber is still very much number one and Lyft is still the underdog.

No.... Tryp is going to have to come up with some way to differentiate its service in a way that will make pax actually want to switch.

I don't see a way of competing effectively with Uber that would work long-term.
Even as the underdog, Lyft has 30% of the US rideshare market. That's nothing to sneeze at.

If Tryp were to get 10% of the market, they'd be doing over $1 billion per year.

Neither Lyft nor Tryp have to beat #1. Wendy's and Burger King do very well for themselves despite not beating McDonalds.


This is mentioned a lot. However, if we look at how US GAAP accounting principles work, not all research and development costs end up on the profit and loss statement. Investments in vehicles, test facilities, software, patents etc etc do not get expensed; instead they get capitalised and end up on the balance sheet. This is generally any property that is not for resale and has an expected life of greater than 12 months. The only R&D activity that ends up on the profit and loss, and in this case contributes to Uber's losses, is expensable items such as programmer's salaries, heat & light for development facilities etc. Just to illustrate some numbers, if all of the $5 billion loss was due to AI programmers' salaries, for example, and programmers earn $150,000 per year, that would be enough to employ 33,333 programmers on their AI project. However, Uber only has 12,000 employees, of all types, in its entire company. None of us know exactly what Uber's R&D expense is, but just by sense-checking the numbers and how investments are financially accounted for, it's clear that there's a lot more behind Uber's losses than that.
Call it whatever you want. Tryp won't have any of it.

The most high-profile settlement that Uber has reached that I know of is the $100m one agreed in California. However, $100m is just 2% of one year's losses of $5bn. It's a drop in the bucket.
Add them all up, plus all the money they spent on lobbyists to get laws changed.

It is true that the rideshare market cost UberLyft billions to create and that the industry is now mature. Everyone now knows what Uber and Lyft are. However, if what you say was true; that now the market is more mature there is less cost involved for the providers, then we would be seeing now that Uber's costs would be declining, and losses narrowing or even turning into profit. However, in reality, Uber's costs keep increasing, and each year their losses continue to go higher and higher.
Neither Uber nor Lyft believe it's mature yet. According to Marketwatch, the rideshare market still has 500% growth between now and the year 2030, as Uber and Lyft continue to convince people to change their lifestyles. Tryp will just ride their coattails.

If I were Uber, I would not be worried about Tryp. Uber is already taking pre-emptive measures against new entrants in the industry by introducing its new customer loyalty program. "Rewards", I think they're calling it. Whenever a new entrant comes onto the scene, Uber will just ramp up the sweetners to its pax in the affected markets.

Hopefully a new entrant will appear which does have the ability to take on Uber/Lyft, but I have not seen one yet.
Honestly, with the growth of the industry, I think there is plenty of room for more players, and I agree, Uber, and even Lyft, have no reason to be worried about them. So while I have argument for how Tryp will compete with Uber and Lyft, ultimately I don't think they have to. Eventually I think there will be as many brands of rideshare as there are brands of gas stations. And personally, I hope another competitor comes in with a nationwide roll out plan that uses a subscription model WITHOUT using MLM sales reps.
 

goneubering

Well-Known Member
http://www.TrypRides.com



The booking fee will also only be $1.99, which is $0.50 to $2.00 less than Uber and Lyft, due to them jacking up the booking fee numerous times over the years.

Tryp will also never surge.

Riders also receive reward points for taking rides.



Even as the underdog, Lyft has 30% of the US rideshare market. That's nothing to sneeze at.

If Tryp were to get 10% of the market, they'd be doing over $1 billion per year.

Neither Lyft nor Tryp have to beat #1. Wendy's and Burger King do very well for themselves despite not beating McDonalds.




Call it whatever you want. Tryp won't have any of it.



Add them all up, plus all the money they spent on lobbyists to get laws changed.



Neither Uber nor Lyft believe it's mature yet. According to Marketwatch, the rideshare market still has 500% growth between now and the year 2030, as Uber and Lyft continue to convince people to change their lifestyles. Tryp will just ride their coattails.



Honestly, with the growth of the industry, I think there is plenty of room for more players, and I agree, Uber, and even Lyft, have no reason to be worried about them. So while I have argument for how Tryp will compete with Uber and Lyft, ultimately I don't think they have to. Eventually I think there will be as many brands of rideshare as there are brands of gas stations. And personally, I hope another competitor comes in with a nationwide roll out plan that uses a subscription model WITHOUT using MLM sales reps.
Tryp will NEVER surge? That sounds like a major blunder.
 

The Gift of Fish

Well-Known Member
Tryp will NEVER surge? That sounds like a major blunder.
Yes, in a recruitment webinar hosted by one of Tryp's "influencers" he was boasting about Tryp never surging as if it were a good thing for drivers....

Neither Uber nor Lyft believe it's mature yet. According to Marketwatch, the rideshare market still has 500% growth between now and the year 2030, as Uber and Lyft continue to convince people to change their lifestyles. Tryp will just ride their coattails.



Honestly, with the growth of the industry, I think there is plenty of room for more players, and I agree, Uber, and even Lyft, have no reason to be worried about them. So while I have argument for how Tryp will compete with Uber and Lyft, ultimately I don't think they have to. Eventually I think there will be as many brands of rideshare as there are brands of gas stations. And personally, I hope another competitor comes in with a nationwide roll out plan that uses a subscription model WITHOUT using MLM sales reps.
I guess we'll find out soon enough what benefit Tryp is able to be to drivers.

I also hope that a new entrant comes in to offer a viable alternative to Uber and Lyft. Both companies are just leeches, and both pax and drivers would be better off without them. Uber is still planning to spend who knows how many hundreds of millions on its new trophy offices while it whittles our fares lower and lower. F them and their offices.This is what we'll be paying for from the fruits of our labour:

 

possibledriver

Well-Known Member
Much verbose recruiting for a new market mlm. No thanks. My market will never get thousands of gullible sheep to sign up . We never have more that 15 in the airport queue.
 

UberHammer

Well-Known Member
Past Sponsor
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Re: merchant accounts

Every driver will be paying the merchant account rates which will remove 2-6% from your earnings.
Yep. I've received no confirmation from Tryp on this. But I think it's safe to assume the driver pays the merchant fees since they own the merchant account being used. My wife and I own a retail business and the fees average around 3% of the sale.

So Tryp drivers will be keeping 95% of Uber's rates instead of 75% like Uber drivers do. Tryp drivers keep 100% of the fare, but Tryp rates are below Uber rates by 2% (down to 98%), and then they'll pay 3% in merchant fees (down to 95%).

Basically a Tryp driver is paying $199 so that every Tryp ride they take that month pays like a 1.267x surged Uber ride.
 

Actionjax

Well-Known Member
So what we have here is a traditional Taxi dispatch model. You pay every month regardless if you get 1 trip or 100.

That does not work when you can't take street hails or private rides on the side.

As a rider why would I even bother downloading the App? What is the benefit for me the traveling public with a 3rd option and Uber is #1 and Lyft is #2 respectively.

I never care about a new app as I have seen many come and go unless they have something to driver riders to the app. Help me understand what that is? You say that ride share is a growth industry....yet there has been a contraction on rides on both platforms and even Lyft and Uber are starting to subsidise the cost of rides to just maintain.

I can't believe a smart guy like yourself bought your own BS.
 

UberHammer

Well-Known Member
Past Sponsor
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So what we have here is a traditional Taxi dispatch model. You pay every month regardless if you get 1 trip or 100.
If Tryp drivers don't get enough rides from the Tryp platform to satisfy them, then they won't renew the next month. If they do get enough rides to satisfy them, then they'll keep renewing.

This isn't much different than Uber and Lyft drivers quitting because they got tired of waiting for hours for their next ride, except that a HUGE reason that occurs is because it's free to go online on those platforms.

The amount of drivers online with Tryp will be limited to only those willing to pay to be online with them.

That does not work when you can't take street hails or private rides on the side.
I disagree that it doesn't work. As long as drivers are satisfied with the amount of rides they get, it works. The only reason it doesn't work is if Tryp can't keep enough drivers satisfied for them to make the revenue they need to continue operating. That's the free market working as it should. Has nothing to do with whether or not the drivers can get work via another method.

Even still, Tryp drivers can continue taking requests from the Uber and Lyft platforms too. When Uber and Lyft are surging, I fully expect drivers to turn Tryp off. But when Uber and Lyft are at base rates, Tryp rides are paying like a 1.267x surge. $948 worth of 1.267x Tryp rides in a month and the $199 is paid for. Any Tryp ride after that is all profit. Full time drivers making $3000+ per month would only need 1/3 of their rides to be Tryp to cover the $199.

So in this case, I think you're wrong twice over.

As a rider why would I even bother downloading the App? What is the benefit for me the traveling public with a 3rd option and Uber is #1 and Lyft is #2 respectively.

I never care about a new app as I have seen many come and go unless they have something to driver riders to the app. Help me understand what that is?
Booking fee only $1.99 ($0.50 to $2.00 cheaper than Uber/Lyft booking fees)
Rates are 2% lower than Uber/Lyft
Never surges
Reward points

A lot of riders treat rideshare like they treat gas stations. They chose the one that's cheapest and relatively close. With the cheaper booking fees and rates, a typical Tryp ride is going to be $1.00 or more cheaper for the customer than the same ride on Uber and Lyft.

You say that ride share is a growth industry....yet there has been a contraction on rides on both platforms and even Lyft and Uber are starting to subsidise the cost of rides to just maintain.

I can't believe a smart guy like yourself bought your own BS.
https://www.marketwatch.com/story/ride-hailing-industry-expected-to-grow-eightfold-to-285-billion-by-2030-2017-05-24
 

Crosbyandstarsky

Active Member
1) I hate MLMs; 2) I signed up to drive for Tryp; and 3) I am not a hypocrite.

If you are already familiar with the new rideshare company Tryp, then you know they use MLM (Multi-Level Marketing) to recruit drivers to their rideshare platform. So how can I state both #1 and #2 without being a hypocrite?

The reason I hate MLMs is not because they are MLMs. I hate them because of why people who become MLM sales reps fail. In fact, the reason I signed up to drive for Tryp is because Tryp avoids that same why that causes drivers to fail on Uber and Lyft.


Uber and Lyft drivers suffer from the same problem MLM sales reps do.


The biggest reason people who join up to sell for MLMs fail is because the market gets saturated with sales reps for the MLM. If you were the only sales rep in town for the MLM you joined, you’d have a pretty good chance at succeeding as a sales rep for the MLM (assuming it’s a decent product or service). But when your neighbor is also a sales rep for the same MLM, the woman across the street is too, five people on the next block also are, two dozen in the apartment complex around the corner are too, etc, etc…. then it’s close to impossible for any sales rep of the MLM to succeed, except for those at the top that recruited so well that they created the saturation now being experienced by those below them.

In a nutshell, when there’s another one just like you on every street corner, you are highly likely to fail as an MLM sales rep.

Let me say that again, as you can’t miss this point… when there’s another one just like you on every street corner, you are highly likely to fail as an MLM sales rep.

Does that sound familiar? It should. If you are an Uber/Lyft driver this should be hitting home with you, because unless you drive for Uber/Lyft in some remote area, you’ve experienced that exact same issue in the cities Uber and Lyft operates in. And if you haven’t…. just wait. The gig seems great for a while, and then all the sudden you can’t make half of what you were before, because there are drivers online everywhere. This is a big reason why Uber has as high as 96% of their drivers quit within a year of starting to drive (see CNBC.com: https://www.cnbc.com/2017/04/20/only-4-percent-of-uber-drivers-remain-after-a-year-says-report.html).


99% fail… 96% quit… Tomato…. ToMAHto….


Similarly speaking, FTC studies have shown that as many as 99% of people who join MLMs as sales reps fail (see FTC.gov: https://www.ftc.gov/sites/default/files/documents/public_comments/trade-regulation-rule-disclosure-requirements-and-prohibitions-concerning-business-opportunities-ftc.r511993-00010 /00010-57283.pdf). So…. MLM sales rep…. Uber driver…. one on every street corner…. 99% fail…. 96% quit…. Are you seeing the comparison here?

Forget that a driver is a completely different job than being a sales rep. Because It’s not the type of job that matters. Also forget that Uber and Lyft are not MLMs. Because it’s not the type of company that matters. It’s the over-saturated market conditions that matter.

If it looks like a duck, and quacks like a duck, it probably is a duck. Being a sales rep in an over-saturated market is a duck. Being an Uber/Lyft driver in an over-saturated market is a duck. They are both ducks, because over-saturation sucks. The model MLMs use naturally results in over-saturation of their sales reps, and the model Uber and Lyft use naturally result in over-saturation of their drivers. So, the reason I hate MLMs is the exact same reason I hate Uber and Lyft. Their business models both naturally result in over-saturation.


Doesn’t that make Tryp twice as bad?


So now, you might be thinking, wouldn’t that make Tryp twice as bad? Isn’t it just combining the Uber model with an MLM model?

For the driver, the answer is clearly no, for two reasons: 1) Tryp’s subscription-based service fee model avoids the problem that both Uber and Lyft’s models suffer from that results in the over-saturation of drivers on their platforms; and 2) Tryp drivers don’t have to be MLM sales reps… Tryp drivers can just be drivers.


How does Tryp avoid driver over-saturation?


Drivers have been asking Uber and Lyft for years to either put a limit on the number of drivers that can sign up, or a limit on the number of drivers that can be online at the same time. Such limits would be very similar to what cities have done for decades, where they limit the number of taxi licenses, sometimes called medallions. In New York city, one taxi medallion was worth nearly $1 million to the person that owned it. This is because limits create scarcity, which results in value. It’s a simple economic principle. Government created these limits because without them so many taxis became available, it reduced the value of their services so much that the taxi drivers couldn’t make a living (a situation very similar to why 96% of drivers Uber drivers quit within a year).


What the drivers are asking Uber and Lyft to do would also be like limitations some other driving gig apps have, like Doordash, where a Doordash delivery driver can’t logon to be available to accept deliveries unless the app is allowing more drivers to logon in an area.


However, Uber and Lyft benefit from the over-saturation of drivers on their platforms. When it’s occurring, riders get matched to a driver closer and quicker than they would if the market was not over-saturated with drivers, which reduces the chances of the potential rider using the other platform to get a ride. So, Uber and Lyft have absolutely zero reason to do anything about this. They would never add a feature to their platform that creates such a limit unless some serious market condition, or government regulation forced them to.


Tryp on the other hand doesn’t even need to add such a feature. The subscription-based service fee model Tryp uses naturally results in limitation. According to Uber, around half of Uber drivers drive for Uber for less than 10 hours per week (see Fastcompany.com: https://www.fastcompany.com/90240917/driving-for-uber-and-lyft-full-time-is-getting-harder). That means that around half of Uber drivers would not sign up to drive for Tryp, because they don’t drive enough to benefit from Tryp’s once a month $199 service fee subscription model. The full time Uber drivers who are having $1000+ in service fees taken from their fares will love only having to only pay $199 in service fees instead of $1000+. But for most drivers who drive less than 10 hours per week, the $199 monthly Tryp service fee would cost them more than the total service fees Uber is currently taking from their fares every month. Thus, they won’t drive for Tryp.


A subscription fee is a barrier to entry… a limitation.


That is what is called a “barrier to entry”. The barrier limits the number of people who enter. Tryp doesn’t have to create a feature on the platform to limit the number of drivers, because their $199 barrier to entry does that naturally. So, if all existing rideshare riders are potential Tryp riders, but only half of existing rideshare drivers are potential Tryp drivers, Tryp is naturally going to have a healthier rider to driver ratio on their platform compared to Uber and Lyft, as Tryp establishes its presence in the rideshare market.


In fact, to the driver it doesn’t even matter what share of the rideshare market Tryp gets. In other words, the question “will Tryp get enough riders”, while being important to the owners of Tryp, is somewhat meaningless to the drivers. Uber could get a million ride requests in day, but if there are a million drivers online that day, every Uber driver is going to average 1 ride a day. That’s what over-saturation does. To the drivers, it’s not the volume of riders a platform gets. It’s the ratio of riders to drivers on the platform that matters. A healthier ratio is less saturated with drivers, which results in more ride requests getting assigned to drivers on the platform.


If Tryp gets as little as 2% of riders and 1% of drivers in the rideshare market to switch, Tryp drivers benefit from a rider to driver ratio that’s twice as healthy as they what they experience on Uber and Lyft. And if Tryp gets as much as 30% of riders and 15% of drivers to switch Tryp drivers still have a rider to driver ratio that’s twice as healthy. So regardless of what share of the rideshare market Tryp gets, Tryp drivers get the same ratio benefit. So, drivers in the first month of Tryp’s existence can expect the same ratio benefit produced by the $199/month barrier to entry as Tryp drivers in the 10th year of Tryp’s existence, despite how much smaller Tryp would be in their 1st month than they would be in year 10.


It's the subscription model, not the company, that is great.


I’ve said I hate a few things so far. I said I hate MLMs. I said I hate Uber and Lyft. I said I hate over-saturation, and the reasons that lead to over-saturation. All that hate leads me to love a subscription based rideshare model. That doesn’t mean I love Tryp. That means I love the subscription-based model they’re using. If some other new rideshare company started with this same subscription-based model, I’d love it too. It’s the model, not the company that uses it, that makes it great.


Why being an MLM has no impact on drivers.


But Tryp is still an MLM, so drivers will fail because of that right?


Wrong (doing my best Trump speaking into the mic impression).

View attachment 290781


Tryp drivers are NOT MLM sales reps. When you are a Tryp driver and you logon to Tryp’s website, you will see an “upgrade” tab. When you view that tab, you will see them advertising to you to upgrade to what they call an “Influencer”, and how much it costs you to upgrade. An influencer is a sales rep. They receive compensation via commissions, residual income and bonuses for successfully selling the Tryp platform to drivers, none of which a non-Influencer Tryp driver qualifies for. And yes, it is an MLM model, making a Tryp influencer an MLM sales rep.


And everything I’ve said about the MLM model resulting in the market being saturated with sales reps holds 100% true here. The FTC study (linked above) that show that 99% of MLM sales reps fails is applicable here. 99% of Tryp influencers will probably fail (probably fewer than that in the beginning, but over time it will naturally climb that high because saturation in inevitable in the model). Even if Tryp influencers are ten times more successful than other MLM sales reps, that still means 90% will fail. So, unless you really, really, REALLY believe you can succeed, and are willing to take the effort to execute it, then don’t waste your time, money, and effort on upgrading to a Tryp Influencer. It’s just that simple. Just say no…. and just drive for Tryp.


Sometimes you just gotta commit in order to try


My dream would be a rideshare company that uses a subscription-based service fee model without also being an MLM. But I can’t earn a living in my dreams. So, in reality I do what’s best for me. And in reality, the rideshare company offering the best rideshare model for a driver that does 10+ hours per week is Tryp. So, I’m signed up to drive for Tryp, and can’t wait for them to launch in my city. That said, I still have concerns. After a month or two, I could learn to hate their app. It’s possible. I’m not ignoring the possibility of problems when they do finally launch. But Uber and Lyft are so bad at what they are right now that I am willing to give Tryp a try. I am hoping for something better. As the character Andy Dufresne said in the movie The Shawskank Redemption, “Remember Red, hope is a good thing, maybe the best of things, and no good thing ever dies.” To me that means that even if Tryp fails, I will still have hope that something better than Uber and Lyft comes along, and that hope is a good thing.


So, if Tryp needs drivers to commit before they launch, then part of my hope and willingness to try them includes me stepping up to make that commitment. Maybe I am unique in that way. Uber and Lyft have driven me (pun intended) to try many different things due to my hope (Doordash, Postmates, Grubhub, Amazon Flex, Field Agent, Mobee, Gigwalk, Easyshift, Stringr, Roadie, etc, etc..). My hope includes hoping that my market gets enough drivers like me willing to commit to Tryp so they launch, and we can then all get to see what they can do for us.


So that’s how I can state that I hate MLMs, that I am signed up to drive for Try, and not be a hypocrite.


In fact, I’m kind of looking forward to a time when Tryp’s influencers reach the over-saturation point. I’m sure I’ll pull up to a red light and look over to see a 5 hour per week Uber driver parked next to a Tryp influencer standing on the curb who was trying to get the driver to sign up for a model that would never work for them. Then the driver will say, “I wish you were cheaper, ‘cause I can’t seem to get any riders”. To which the influencer will say, “Yeah, I can’t find any new Tryp drivers either”. As the light turns green, I will say to them both, “Yeah, over-saturation sucks, don’t it”, as I pull away to drive to my next Tryp pickup as a Tryp driver. I might even buy a microphone so I can drop it on the road before I pull away.


To sign up for your free Tryp account and learn more about becoming a Tryp driver, visit https://tryprides.net/?re=tryprober8746 and use the referral code "tryprober8746".

------------------------------

This article is sponsored by UberHammer . UberPeople.NET is not affiliated with nor endorsing TRYP.
They need to take this advertising down. It’s just someone recruiting
 

Actionjax

Well-Known Member
If Tryp drivers don't get enough rides from the Tryp platform to satisfy them, then they won't renew the next month. If they do get enough rides to satisfy them, then they'll keep renewing.

This isn't much different than Uber and Lyft drivers quitting because they got tired of waiting for hours for their next ride, except that a HUGE reason that occurs is because it's free to go online on those platforms.

The amount of drivers online with Tryp will be limited to only those willing to pay to be online with them.



I disagree that it doesn't work. As long as drivers are satisfied with the amount of rides they get, it works. The only reason it doesn't work is if Tryp can't keep enough drivers satisfied for them to make the revenue they need to continue operating. That's the free market working as it should. Has nothing to do with whether or not the drivers can get work via another method.

Even still, Tryp drivers can continue taking requests from the Uber and Lyft platforms too. When Uber and Lyft are surging, I fully expect drivers to turn Tryp off. But when Uber and Lyft are at base rates, Tryp rides are paying like a 1.267x surge. $948 worth of 1.267x Tryp rides in a month and the $199 is paid for. Any Tryp ride after that is all profit. Full time drivers making $3000+ per month would only need 1/3 of their rides to be Tryp to cover the $199.

So in this case, I think you're wrong twice over.



Booking fee only $1.99 ($0.50 to $2.00 cheaper than Uber/Lyft booking fees)
Rates are 2% lower than Uber/Lyft
Never surges
Reward points

A lot of riders treat rideshare like they treat gas stations. They chose the one that's cheapest and relatively close. With the cheaper booking fees and rates, a typical Tryp ride is going to be $1.00 or more cheaper for the customer than the same ride on Uber and Lyft.



https://www.marketwatch.com/story/ride-hailing-industry-expected-to-grow-eightfold-to-285-billion-by-2030-2017-05-24

Yep nothing tangible on anything you said. 2% lower than Lyft and Uber. And when there is a huge surge you think any driver will even run Tryp? Again your valuation is off on what you think will work. If anything you will get just the lowlifes who were banned off the other two platforms.
 

Actionjax

Well-Known Member
This site is maintained through advertising. I think that's fair enough given the informational value of the site in general.
He is a paid sponsor of the board so his advertisement is allowed. But it's safe to say when someone who sponsors a post its for monetary return and not informational. I wish the poster all the luck in the world. I'm sure he believes he has the right answer to everyones Uber issues.
 

UberHammer

Well-Known Member
Past Sponsor
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  • #56
And when there is a huge surge you think any driver will even run Tryp?
I said in the post you quoted that Tryp drivers would turn off Tryp when Uber and Lyft are surging.

This is evidence to me that you aren't reading what I've posted, and just desire to grind your ax.
 

The Gift of Fish

Well-Known Member
He is a paid sponsor of the board so his advertisement is allowed. But it's safe to say when someone who sponsors a post its for monetary return and not informational. I wish the poster all the luck in the world. I'm sure he believes he has the right answer to everyones Uber issues.
Yes, he clearly believes that Tryp will be beneficial to drivers. Not saying you have, but there's point in people trying to roast/flame him. It's just business - he has a business proposition for people and they will either take him up on it or pass. Nothing I have seen from anyone has convinced me that Tryp would benefit me so I'll be one of the ones who passes on it, but that may change if they do actually start to offer drivers a decent amount of trips.
 

Actionjax

Well-Known Member
I said in the post you quoted that Tryp drivers would turn off Tryp when Uber and Lyft are surging.

This is evidence to me that you aren't reading what I've posted, and just desire to grind your ax.
No axe to grind. But it seems a waste of my $200 to shut down the app that in essence I have paid to give me rides up front. And probably the time Tryp would be beneficial to passengers there would be no drivers interested in taking them as they would shut down and do Uber or Lyft during the surge.

As a corporate traveler I know Uber works almost everywhere. Lyft everywhere in the US. So that's 2 apps on my phone as a passenger. Do I need a 3rd? Hell no. And the 2 big players are integrated in our accounting systems for expenses. Tryp...no where do they cater to the company systems.

I get you are pushing for a 3rd player in the market. But we have 5 other incumbents here in Toronto that have come and gone. No one even made a dent with drivers or passengers. One even went the eco route taking 5% if you drove an electric. For passengers they had a message. Again they didn't dent the market and they actually had a shot,

Your system is truly a Taxi brokerage model. We have them here as well.
 

UberHammer

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No axe to grind. But it seems a waste of my $200 to shut down the app that in essence I have paid to give me rides up front.
How is it waste of your $200 to shut down Tryp when Uber and Lyft are surging? In my market, I'm lucky if 5% of my rides are surge fares. So 95%+ of the time Tryp rides are paying me more than Uber/Lyft rides.

Maybe if I was in a market that surged a lot, then yes, I agree Tryp would be a waste if I'm better off taking a lot of Uber and Lyft surge fares.

And probably the time Tryp would be beneficial to passengers there would be no drivers interested in taking them as they would shut down and do Uber or Lyft during the surge.
If riders are willingly paying for surged Uber and Lyft rides, then I don't see why drivers would keep Tryp on. But as we've learned some surges don't result in rides. The riders just wait until the surge ends before they request their ride. For those kind of surges, the driver would be better off keeping the Tryp app on, because not only would they get a ride request sooner, it will pay them 1.267x more than what Uber and Lyft will pay when the surge finally ends and riders start requesting rides on those platforms again.

As a corporate traveler I know Uber works almost everywhere. Lyft everywhere in the US. So that's 2 apps on my phone as a passenger. Do I need a 3rd? Hell no. And the 2 big players are integrated in our accounting systems for expenses. Tryp...no where do they cater to the company systems.
Tryp doesn't have to win over every rider to succeed. So if saving a minute or two on a line in your expense report is important to you, then stay with Uber and Lyft. But when companies learn that Tryp is cheaper than Uber and Lyft and never surges, don't be surprised when companies start requiring their employees to check Tryp first when they are traveling for work.

I get you are pushing for a 3rd player in the market. But we have 5 other incumbents here in Toronto that have come and gone. No one even made a dent with drivers or passengers. One even went the eco route taking 5% if you drove an electric. For passengers they had a message. Again they didn't dent the market and they actually had a shot,

Your system is truly a Taxi brokerage model. We have them here as well.
At this time Tryp has not applied for any permits outside the US. They do have hopes of going international, and if/when they do, Canada is likely the first country outside of the US they will open in. So if/when they do come to Toronto, you'll be beneficiary of seeing how they did in the US first.
 

123dragon

Active Member
Obviously this has a lot of red flags. It's not even legally considered an MLM pyramid scheme because it doesn't have a product yet! Ride share guy posted a good article on Tryp.

Neither what was posted here or what is in the article I reference give any insight into how Tryp is actually going to grow a customer base. What is even the order. In DC we hit 5000 paying drivers, what happens next? Building a customer base is really expensive, that is really where rideshare companies burn a lot of money. Nothing in their strategy really speaks to customer acquisition.

I would beware until they actually have an operational city where drivers can share their experience with how busy it is and how the model is working.
 
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