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Über or Uber?

Maven

Well-Known Member
Über is the correct spelling in German. TK decided to remove the umlauts. Most Americans think that Uber means means "super" or "big'. So people in the US say “oh that is uber cool” or things like that. In English things can be uber-awesome or uber-cute….

German speakers know that Über actually means about or over. They must feel strange about this appropriation. How do you German-speakers out there feel about this?

Uber has even threatened other American businesses with lawsuits about including "Uber" in their names. There may be other cases where Uber has actually brought a lawsuit. US Senator Richard Blumenthal is investigating one case in Connecticut.
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http://www.news12.com/story/36223537/uber-allegedly-forces-fairfield-business-to-close
Uber allegedly forces Fairfield business to close

Posted: Aug 26, 2017 1:16 PM EST Updated: Aug 27, 2017 9:18 PM EST
Video at link above


FAIRFIELD, CT - Sen. Richard Blumenthal says he is investigating the ride-sharing giant Uber for allegedly forcing a small business in Fairfield to shut down due to a similar name.

Dawn Marie Ganino opened her business, UberSalon, one year ago and she says she was making money and doing great.

UberSalon was based on the motto, "We bring the salon to you." The business consisted of a group of haircutters who made house calls.

Recently, Uber sent Ganino a letter over an alleged trademark violation. Not wanting an expensive legal battle, Ganino shut down, leaving 20 stylists out of work.

"It's heartbreaking to have your business crushed and that's what happened to me," Ganino said.

Sen. Blumenthal says the corporate giant does not have the legal right to lay exclusive claim to the word 'Uber,' and he says by doing so, the company was being a bully.

He says if a company wants to call itself , or have the word uber in the name in general, it should be able to. Ganino says she has no intention of trying to get her business going again, but she just wants the world to know what happened. She says she has gone back to cutting hair at a brick-and-mortar salon in Fairfield and hopes no other small business will have UberSalon to go through what she did.

In a statement, Uber said, "We appreciate UberSalon's interest in our on-demand delivery service model, but we requested that they not use our protected trademark to promote it. As a trademark holder, Uber has an obligation to police unauthorized uses of its trademark. The letter we sent in December asked UberSalon to transition to another name, not to shut down."
 
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tohunt4me

Well-Known Member
Über is the correct spelling in German. TK decided to remove the umlauts. Most Americans think that Uber means means "super" or "big'. So people in the US say “oh that is uber cool” or things like that. In English things can be uber-awesome or uber-cute….

German speakers know that Über actually means about or over. They must feel strange about this appropriation. How do you German-speakers out there feel about this?

Uber has even sued other American businesses about including "Uber" in their names. CT Senator Richard Blumenthal is investigating one case.
___

http://www.news12.com/story/36223537/uber-allegedly-forces-fairfield-business-to-close
Uber allegedly forces Fairfield business to close

Posted: Aug 26, 2017 1:16 PM EST Updated: Aug 27, 2017 9:18 PM EST
Video at link above


FAIRFIELD, CT - Sen. Richard Blumenthal says he is investigating the ride-sharing giant Uber for allegedly forcing a small business in Fairfield to shut down due to a similar name.

Dawn Marie Ganino opened her business, UberSalon, one year ago and she says she was making money and doing great.

UberSalon was based on the motto, "We bring the salon to you." The business consisted of a group of haircutters who made house calls.

Recently, Uber sent Ganino a letter over an alleged trademark violation. Not wanting an expensive legal battle, Ganino shut down, leaving 20 stylists out of work.

"It's heartbreaking to have your business crushed and that's what happened to me," Ganino said.

Sen. Blumenthal says the corporate giant does not have the legal right to lay exclusive claim to the word 'Uber,' and he says by doing so, the company was being a bully.

He says if a company wants to call itself , or have the word uber in the name in general, it should be able to. Ganino says she has no intention of trying to get her business going again, but she just wants the world to know what happened. She says she has gone back to cutting hair at a brick-and-mortar salon in Fairfield and hopes no other small business will have UberSalon to go through what she did.

In a statement, Uber said, "We appreciate UberSalon's interest in our on-demand delivery service model, but we requested that they not use our protected trademark to promote it. As a trademark holder, Uber has an obligation to police unauthorized uses of its trademark. The letter we sent in December asked UberSalon to transition to another name, not to shut down."
So.
Rules and Regulation of Industry are Bad

Unless . . .
It Regulates others.

If language becomes trademarked and patented . . .
I could imagine reading blank newspapers . . .
 

Snowblind

Well-Known Member
Über actually means about or over
As a native German Speaker, let me correct you on this one.
(well, not really correcting, but adding some facts to this.)
Über actually means above, over or across.

About can also be used, but has a completely different meaning.
like: "Ich kann über dich reden"
translated: I can talk about you.

The word über is mostly used in a different meaning, for example:
"Ich will über den berg."
means:
"I want across (above) this Hill."

So one word in the german language can have tons of other, completely different meanings.
Finally,
there is no uber in the german language as far as I know.
Cheers,
 

Maven

Well-Known Member
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #4
As a native German Speaker, let me correct you on this one.
(well, not really correcting, but adding some facts to this.)
Über actually means above, over or across.

About can also be used, but has a completely different meaning.
like: "Ich kann über dich reden"
translated: I can talk about you.

The word über is mostly used in a different meaning, for example:
"Ich will über den berg."
means:
"I want across (above) this Hill."

So one word in the german language can have tons of other, completely different meanings.
Finally,
there is no uber in the german language as far as I know.
Cheers,
Thanks for the clarification :smiles:
 
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